Posts Categorized: Chiropractic

27
May 2015

How does your sport rank?

There is a longstanding debate among men over which sport is the most demanding. In making the argument, different men will consider different physical characteristics. For example, certain sports rely heavily on the cardiovascular system, and measures like VO2 Max are valid indicators of performance capability. In contrast, other sports won’t rely as heavily on cardiovascular measures but will require more significant displays of speed, agility, strength, or overall durability, all of which place an incredible physical demand on the body.


With consideration to the multi-factorial physical demands of various sports, let’s dive into the top 10 most physically demanding sports. Each sport is ranked on a scale from 1-10, based on the demand placed on four physical attributes or systems: muscular strength and power, speed and quickness, cardiovascular endurance, and overall durability.

10. Swimming

Swimming can be incredibly exhausting, as the continuous nature of the sport doesn’t leave much time for recovery. Since the lower and upper body are constantly active in producing motion, and the core functions to stabilize the trunk and transfer force throughout the process, there’s not a second of rest. But swimming loses points in our rating because it is not ground-based and, therefore, is less stressful to the musculoskeletal system than the other sports on this list.


Muscular Strength/Power: 3
Speed/Quickness: 6
Cardiovascular Endurance: 9
Overall Durability: 2


Total: 20

9. Tennis

Tennis matches involve short-duration bursts of all-out energy in the form of quick sprints, transitional movements and hitting the ball. All of these movements require a great deal of strength, speed, power, and control. The interval nature of tennis requires the body to operate at higher intensities than more continuous sports. Add in the fact that tennis is frequently played under the heat of a blazing sun, and tennis creates a unique, incredibly taxing experience.



Muscular Strength/Power: 3
Speed/Quickness: 8
Cardiovascular Endurance: 6
Overall Durability: 4


Total: 21

Find the rest of this top 10 list at AskMen.com!

12
April 2015
Herniated Disc Pain?Chiropractic adjustments were just as effective as epidural injections for patients with back pain in a new study — without the risks and at lower cost. The findings show that chiropractic can significantly reduce pain in patients with lumbar disc herniation, and is less expensive than medical treatment. Lumbar epidural injections are frequently used for back pain and sciatica in patients with lumbar disc herniation, failed back surgery syndrome, and spinal stenosis. During the procedure, a physician injects a high dose of pain medication, and sometimes steroids, into the area of the lumbar spine around the damaged nerve. This temporarily reduces inflammation and pain. Although the injections are widely used, controversy lingers due to the lack of a studies with placebo controls, and questions about the effects of steroids versus anesthetic alone. Side effects of steroids include a weakening of muscles and spinal bones around the affected nerve and a disruption of the body’s natural hormone balance. It’s also unclear whether epidural injections are more effective than other conservative treatments for lumbar disc herniation. While a number of studies have established the efficacy of chiropractic for low-back pain, fewer have tested its comparative effectiveness with other treatments for lumbar disc herniation. In a study from the Journal of Manual and Physiological Therapeutics, researchers from Switzerland compared the effects of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and epidural nerve root injections (NRI). The study included 102 with symptomatic, MRI-confirmed lumbar disc herniation who were treated with either SMT or NRI. After one month of treatment, both groups experienced significant improvements. Of the patients under chiropractic care, 76.5% said they were “much better” or  “better” compared to 62.7% of NRI patients. Sixty percent of chiropractic patients had a significant reduction in pain compared to 53% of NRI patients. These slight differences were not statistically significant. While none of the chiropractic patients received surgery, three of the NRI patients eventually opted for an operation. Since the treatments were considered equally effective, the cost analysis became even more important for comparing both treatments, the researchers pointed out.  On average, one month of chiropractic adjustments was less expensive than NRI ($558 vs. $729). Their analysis included only the “minimum cost” of NRIs, and did not take into account other costs that are frequently tacked on like additional consultations with clinicians, multiple injections, or possible surgery. Additionally, treatment cost for chiropractic patients may have been slightly higher than normal since they were required to receive an MRI to be in the study. Many chiropractic patients do not receive MRI because imaging guidelines do not recommend MRIs for patients with lumbar disc herniation in most cases. In contrast, MRIs are typically performed before injections or other more invasive procedures. Although randomized trials are needed to confirm these results, the authors concluded that, “There were no significant differences in outcomes between the more universally accepted treatment procedure of NRI compared to SMT.” This study suggest that patients can experience substantial relief from chiropractic care without worrying about the side effects of steroids or drugs. It may even save them money, since research suggests that chiropractic patients have lower annual medical costs compared to patients under traditional care. Source

09
April 2015
Auto accident injury? Our chiropractors are specialized in the area of caring for patients who have been in an automobile accident.  Give us a call today or click here to schedule an appointment and see the difference FIX can make for you. [hr toptext=”” size=”superTiny” custom_size=”” hide_mobile_hr=”true”] Over 1 million people are injured in rear-end collisions each year in the US, and many of these “minor” crashes result in real injuries. In fact, research shows that many people develop chronic pain from these types of car crashes. Chiropractic is one of the best ways to treat and recover from auto injuries. By restoring your spine to it’s healthy functioning without drugs or surgery, it’s the perfect approach. Here’s why chiropractic is the best way to treating your auto injury pain: 1. Chiropractic Reduces Inflammation During a crash, the ligaments and muscles of your spine can be stretched or experience micro-tears. X-rays or MRI scans usually aren’t sophisticated enough to diagnose these kinds of injuries, but this tissue damage causes the area to become inflamed. Many times, an auto injury patient won’t feel much discomfort immediately after the crash, but they wake up the next morning to a stiff and painful neck. This is caused by the body’s inflammation response to these micro-lesions. A 2010 study1 found that chiropractic adjustments actually helps the body release anti-inflammatory Interleukin 6 (IL-6), an important substance created by your body that’s used to help heal acute injuries. 2. Chiropractic Restores Motion Another problem with inflammation is that the tissues become immobile, which can slow healing to the area. Ligaments of the spine don’t get many nutrients or blood supply normally, and this becomes even more difficult when inflamed and injured. During a chiropractic adjustment, the joints of your spine are mobilized, which helps increase blood flow and healing nutrients to the area. 3. Chiropractic Reduces Scar Tissue Your body heals ligament, tendon, and muscle injuries by creating scar tissue. Scar tissue in an injured area is made up of the same kind of cells as the original tissue, but it’s laid down rapidly and randomly as a temporary “patch” on top of the damaged area. If you get scar tissue in a large muscle, it can be uncomfortable for a while until you stretch it out, but it most likely won’t cause any long-term problems. Scar tissue in the ligaments of your neck or back, however, can be much more debilitating, since we can’t stretch it out ourselves. Your chiropractor focuses the adjustments on these specific vertebral joints that are fixated, effectively stretching them and breaking up the scar tissue in the joint. 4. Chiropractic Relieves Localized Pain Over the last 20 years, countless studies have demonstrated that chiropractic adjustments are a safe and effective way to reduce pain. In fact, a 2013 study found that 94% of patients experienced neck pain relief with manipulation! 5. Chiropractic Reduces Pain in Your Whole Body Many auto injury patients develop more widespread pain after a crash, especially if the original injury wasn’t treated promptly. A 2014 study reported that people who received a chiropractic adjustment had increased levels of pain-reducing hormones in their bloodstream. 6. Chiropractic Relieves Stress A car crash is a very stressful life event, especially if you’re in pain. When your body is exposed to trauma, it goes into a flight or fight response, which can result in anxiety, depression, and stress. A 2011 study4 used PET scans to look at the brains of people who received chiropractic adjustments for neck pain. They found that those patients had reduced brain activity in the parts of the brain responsible for pain processing and stress reactions. They also had significantly lower levels of cortisol, indicating reduced stress. Participants also reported lower pain scores and a better quality of life after treatment. Reducing your overall level of stress is important, because, left untreated, stress can also slow recovery time and increase your risk of developing chronic pain. 7. Chiropractic Works Researchers have recognized that chiropractic is a great way to help people recover from auto injuries for many decades. In 1996, British researchers5 found that 93% of auto injury patients with neck pain experienced dramatic improvement with chiropractic care. In 2015, an Ontario, Canada government group agreed that spinal manipulation, combined with staying active and continuing to work, are the most important factors in recovering quickly from car crash injuries. Source

03
April 2015
Shoulder pain? Shoulders in pain? We can FIX that.  Call or click to schedule a consultation with one of our caring chiropractic practitioners today! The shoulder is an elegant and complex piece of machinery. Its design allows us to reach and use our hands in many different positions. However, while the shoulder joint has great range of motion, it is not very stable. This makes the shoulder vulnerable to problems if any of its parts aren’t in good working order. The rotator cuff tendons are key to the healthy functioning of the shoulder. They are subject to a lot of wear and tear, or degeneration, as we use our arms. Tearing of the rotator cuff tendons is an especially painful injury. A torn rotator cuff creates a very weak shoulder. Most of the time patients with torn rotator cuffs are in late middle age. But rotator cuffs tears can happen at any age. This guide will help you understand
  • what the rotator cuff is
  • how it can become torn
  • what treatments are available for a torn rotator cuff

Chiropractic Treatment

Your chiropractic doctor’s first goal will be to help control your pain and inflammation. At first, treatments, such as electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, heat and ice, focus on easing pain and inflammation. Hands-on treatments and various types of exercises are used to improve the range of motion in your shoulder and the nearby joints and muscles. Gentle joint mobilizations and adjustments are performed to help restore normal biomechanics to the shoulder joint. This is where chiropractic manipulation has an advantage over other specialties. It is important to manipulate and stretch capsular joint restrictions during the treatment phase. Additionally, spinal manipulation to the spine can help remove any joint fixations that can inhibit normal healing and proper motion to the shoulder. Advanced muscle massage and release techniques are used to help restore normal length and elasticity to the muscles, ligaments and tendons. It can also help break down scar tissue and adhesions which in and around the joint and associated soft tissues. Later, you will do strengthening exercises to improve the strength and control of the rotator cuff and shoulder blade muscles. Your chiropractor will help you retrain these muscles to keep the ball of the humerus in the socket. This will help your shoulder move smoothly during all of your activities. You may need chiropractic treatments for six to eight weeks. Most patients are able to get back to their activities with full use of their arm within this amount of time. Even if you don’t need surgery, you may need to follow a program of rehabilitation exercises set forth by your chiropractic doctor. We will create an individualized program to help you regain shoulder function. This includes tips and exercise for improving posture and shoulder alignment. It is also very important to improve the strength and coordination in the rotator cuff and shoulder blade muscles. Your chiropractor can also evaluate your workstation or the way you use your body when you do your activities and suggest changes to avoid further problems.

Anatomy

What exactly is the rotator cuff, and what does it do? The shoulder is made up of three bones: the scapula (shoulder blade), the humerus (upper arm bone), and the clavicle (collarbone). The rotator cuff connects the humerus to the scapula. The rotator cuff is formed by the tendons of four muscles: the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. Tendons attach muscles to bones. Muscles move the bones by pulling on the tendons. The rotator cuff helps raise and rotate the arm. As the arm is raised, the rotator cuff also keeps the humerus tightly in the socket of the scapula. The upper part of the scapula that makes up the roof of the shoulder is called the acromion.bursa is located between the acromion and the rotator cuff tendons. A bursa is a lubricated sac of tissue that cuts down on the friction between two moving parts. Bursae are located all over the body where tissues must rub against each other. In this case, the bursa protects the acromion and the rotator cuff from grinding against each other.

Causes

What causes the rotator cuff to tear? The rotator cuff tendons have areas of very low blood supply. The more blood supply a tissue has, the better and faster it can repair and maintain itself. The areas of poor blood supply in the rotator cuff make these tendons especially vulnerable to degeneration from aging. The degeneration of aging helps explain why the rotator cuff tear is such a common injury later in life. Rotator cuff tears usually occur in areas of the tendon that had low blood supply to begin with and then were further weakened by degeneration. This problem of degeneration may be accelerated by repeating the same types of shoulder motions. This can happen with overhand athletes, such as baseball pitchers. But even doing routine chores like cleaning windows, washing and waxing cars, or painting can cause the rotator cuff to fatigue from overuse. Excessive force can tear weak rotator cuff tendons. This force can come from trying to catch a heavy falling object or lifting an extremely heavy object with the arm extended. The force can also be from a fall directly onto the shoulder. Sometimes injuries that tear the rotator cuff are painful, but sometimes they aren’t. Researchers estimate that up to 40 percent of people may have a mild rotator cuff tear without even knowing it. The typical patient with a rotator cuff tear is in late middle age and has had problems with the shoulder for some time. This patient then lifts a load or suffers an injury that tears the tendon. After the injury, the patient is unable to raise the arm. However, these injuries also occur in young people. Overuse or injury at any age can cause rotator cuff tears.

Symptoms

What does a rotator cuff tear feel like? Rotator cuff tears cause pain and weakness in the affected shoulder. In some cases, a rotator cuff may tear only partially. The shoulder may be painful, but you can still move the arm in a normal range of motion. In general, the larger the tear, the more weakness it causes. In other cases, the rotator cuff tendons completely rupture. A complete tear makes it impossible to move the arm in a normal range of motion. It is usually impossible to raise the arm away from your side by yourself. Most rotator cuff tears cause a vague pain in the shoulder area. They may also cause a “catching” sensation when you move your arm. Most people say they can’t sleep on the affected side due to the pain.

Diagnosis

What tests will my doctor run? Your doctor will ask questions about your medical history, your injury, and your pain. Your doctor will then do a physical examination of the shoulder. The physical exam is most helpful in diagnosing a rotator cuff tear. A complete tear is usually very obvious. If your doctor can move the arm in a normal range of motion, but you can’t move the arm yourself, you most likely have a torn rotator cuff. X-rays won’t show tears in the rotator cuff. However, your doctor may want you to have a shoulder X-ray to see if there are bone spurs, a loss of joint space in the shoulder, or a down-sloping (hooked) acromion. These findings are associated with tears in the rotator cuff. An X-ray can also show if there are calcium deposits in the tendon that are causing your symptoms, a condition called calcific tendonitis. Your doctor will probably also want to do an arthrogram test. An arthrogram involves injecting dye into the shoulder joint and taking several X-rays. If the dye leaks out of the shoulder joint, there is probably a tear in the rotator cuff. Your doctor may ask you to have an MRI scan. An MRI scan is a special imaging test that uses magnetic waves to create pictures of the shoulder in slices. The MRI scan shows tendons as well as bones. This test is painless and requires no needles or injections. Source

24
March 2015

There's a FIX! Chiropractic care is proven to help with headaches.  Schedule an appointment with one of our caring chiropractors today! If you have a headache, you’re not alone. Nine out of ten Americans suffer from headaches. Some are occasional, some frequent, some are dull and throbbing, and some cause debilitating pain and nausea.

What do you do when you suffer from a pounding headache? Do you grit your teeth and carry on? Lie down? Pop a pill and hope the pain goes away? There is a better alternative. Research shows that spinal manipulation – the primary form of care provided by doctors of chiropractic – may be an effective treatment option for tension headaches and headaches that originate in the neck. A report released in 2001 by researchers at the Duke University Evidence-Based Practice Center in Durham, NC, found that spinal manipulation resulted in almost immediate improvement for those headaches that originate in the neck, and had significantly fewer side effects and longer-lasting relief of tension-type headache than a commonly prescribed medication. Also, a 1995 study in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics found that spinal manipulative therapy is an effective treatment for tension headaches and that those who ceased chiropractic treatment after four weeks experienced a sustained therapeutic benefit in contrast with those patients who received a commonly prescribed medication. Headache Triggers Headaches have many causes, or “triggers.” These may include foods, environmental stimuli (noises, lights, stress, etc.) and/or behaviors (insomnia, excessive exercise, blood sugar changes, etc.). About 5 percent of all headaches are warning signals caused by physical problems. Ninety-five percent of headaches are primary headaches, such as tension, migraine, or cluster headaches. These types of headaches are not caused by disease. The headache itself is the primary concern. “The greatest majority of primary headaches are associated with muscle tension in the neck,” says Dr. George B. McClelland, a doctor of chiropractic from Christiansburg, VA. “Today, Americans engage in more sedentary activities than they used to, and more hours are spent in one fixed position or posture. This can increase joint irritation and muscle tension in the neck, upper back and scalp, causing your head to ache.” What Can You Do? The ACA suggests the following:
  • If you spend a large amount of time in one fixed position, such as in front of a computer, on a sewing machine, typing or reading, take a break and stretch every 30 minutes to one hour. The stretches should take your head and neck through a comfortable range of motion.
  • Low-impact exercise may help relieve the pain associated with primary headaches. However, if you are prone to dull, throbbing headaches, avoid heavy exercise. Engage in such activities as walking and low-impact aerobics.
  • Avoid teeth clenching. The upper teeth should never touch the lowers, except when swallowing. This results in stress at the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) – the two joints that connect your jaw to your skull – leading to TMJ irritation and a form of tension headaches.
  • Drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day to help avoid dehydration, which can lead to headaches.
What Can a Doctor of Chiropractic Do? Dr. McClelland says your doctor of chiropractic may do one or more of the following if you suffer from a primary headache:
  • Perform spinal manipulation or chiropractic adjustments to improve spinal function and alleviate the stress on your system.
  • Provide nutritional advice, recommending a change in diet and perhaps the addition of B complex vitamins.
  • Offer advice on posture, ergonomics (work postures), exercises and relaxation techniques. This advice should help to relieve the recurring joint irritation and tension in the muscles of the neck and upper back.
“Doctors of chiropractic undergo extensive training to help their patients in many ways – not just back pain,” says Dr. McClelland. “They know how tension in the spine relates to problems in other parts of the body, and they can take steps to relieve those problems.”

24
February 2015
If you’re a golfer – whether recreational or even a pro like John Cook – you can benefit greatly from the services we offer at FIX. Recently our founder and Clinic Director Dr. Shawn Robek served as John’s private practitioner during the Mitsubishi Champion’s Tour in Hawaii and performed pre and post round performance care on him. When asked what these athletes need in terms of treatment, Dr. Robek said “Golfers utilize chiropractic adjustment to maintain flexibility of the spine, as well as active release technique to break up restrictions and scar tissue in muscle. Corrective exercise is also used to enhance the strength and endurance of deep spinal muscles.” He went on to say that “golfers typically experience knee, hip, and lower back pain as a result of a poor golf swing – all of which can be corrected by our procedures at FIX.  For someone trying to enhance their golf game but not suffering from a specific injury, our strength coach would be a great adjunct.” So if you’re a golfer – what are you waiting for? Set up an appointment with us today and experience the FIX difference.
Dr. Robek of FIX with pro golfer John Cook

09
February 2015
Sports injury rehabilitation is all about getting back in the game quickly and with optimal health. A relatively new tool for the treatment of sports injuries is finding global success, and it is doing so in a fast, efficient way. In fact, Dr. Oz has called it the “no-pill pain buster.” Cold Laser TherapyTrauma from sports injuries causes damage to the cells that make up soft tissues. These damaged cells release chemicals that provoke a natural inflammatory response in the body, which result in redness, swelling, warmth and pain in the injured area. Persistent or recurrent inflammation can predispose athletes to early-onset arthritis or degenerative changes in their joints. This condition can affect the weekend warrior to the elite athlete. The application of cold laser therapy, officially known as low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces short-term inflammation. Additionally, laser therapy significantly lowers the risk of arthritis frequently resulting from sports injuries. Laser therapy is used by professional sports teams and athletes to treat inflammation, provide deep-tissue therapy, and accelerate pain relief to help athletes minimize downtime. For the past decade, LLLT has revolutionized treatment in the professional sports world including NBA, NFL, MLB, NHL and USA Cycling athletes, as well as Ironman triathlon competitors, competitive runners, college athletes, former Olympic athletes, and elite cross-fitters. Mechanism of Action LLLT works to photobiostimulate chemically damaged cells via specific wavelengths of light in a coherent manner. Coherence means that light photons propagate in the same direction, amplitude and phase. This is important to maximize the depth of penetration in order to trigger a biological response. The cell membrane within the skin absorbs these photons via a photochemical effect, not photothermal; therefore, LLLT does not cause heat damage to the tissues. When cells are chemically damaged through injury, they stimulate the pain cycle. LLLT excites kinetic energy within the cells by transmitting these healing stimuli that are photons. Once photons reach the cells of the body, they promote a cascade of cellular activities. LLLT can ignite the production of enzymes, stimulate mitochondria, increase vasodilation and lymphatic drainage, ATP synthesis, and elevate collagen formation substances to prevent scar tissue. This is a critical step in reducing chronic, disabling myofascial pain syndromes. Simply stated, LLLT enables athletes to get out of pain faster and heal at the same time. Literature Support I have found the laser to be a superior tool for the rehabilitation of athletes. LLLT is a scientifically proven and effective treatment for a wide range of sports injuries, including acute and chronic pain; neck and back pain; bursitis; jumper’s knee; tennis elbow; Achilles tendonitis; chronic joint pain of the elbow, wrist, and fingers; plantar fasciitis; and shoulder injuries. As supported by the literature in the field, I see consistent results with my athletic patients for a variety of conditions:
  • Low-level laser therapy is an effective treatment for sports injuries, particularly jumper’s knee, tennis elbow and Achilles tendonitis.
  • Low-level laser therapy has been recommended as a treatment option for tennis elbow.
  • Low-level laser therapy reduces pain after treatment in acute neck pain and up to 22 weeks after completion of treatment.
  • Low-level laser therapy has positive effects on exercise-induced skeletal muscle fatigue and changes in biochemical markers related to post-exercise recovery.
  • A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial showed that LLLT and exercise therapy is more effective than exercise therapy alone for the purposes of improving pain and active / passive ROM in patients with subacromial syndrome.
  • LLLT has been shown to be effective for treating chronic neck and shoulder pain, as well as chronic heel pain from plantar fasciitis.
The ease of using the laser and the speed with which the athletes respond are key features of LLLT. Most laser treatment sessions last from just three to five minutes. In my experience, its versatility is unmatched because it can be a stand-alone treatment or used in conjunction with chiropractic adjustments, soft-tissue release, instrument-assisted treatments, elastic therapeutic tape or any rehab-oriented protocol. An Example: Ankle Sprains One specific application for LLLT is ankle sprains, which have an 80 percent recurrence rate and high rates of subsequent chronic symptoms. The most frequently seen ankle injury is an ankle inversion sprain. There are a host of causes and risk factors for ankle sprains; a previous history of ankle sprain is the most common risk factor. I’ve found LLLT to be instrumental in reducing the swelling and tissue damage that are typically associated with an acute ankle sprain. I’ve seen recovery times that have been literally decreased by days. Chronic ankle sprains is where the benefits of LLLT can truly be seen. Interestingly, most athletes with chronic ankle sprains have a proprioceptive deficit in that injured ankle. Proper proprioceptive exercises coupled with laser therapy have enabled many of my athletes to avoid the recurrence so commonly seen with the injury. After an ankle sprain, there is a significant delay in the onset of activation of the gluteus maximus on the injured side. LLLT applications to the gluteal regions have helped facilitate the gluteus maximus muscle in chronic ankle sprains. Low-level laser therapy has varied benefits and functions as a superior alternative to analgesics, NSAIDs, medications and other modalities. Furthermore, LLLT reduces the need for surgery and has virtually no contraindications. Highly effective, non-invasive and safe, LLLT is easy to implement in any chiropractic setting. In my many years of practice dealing with high-school, college, and professional athletes, I have found LLLT to be the best means for rapid recovery and increased performance from a sports injury. I consider it the most efficient, most versatile tool of the 21st century for sports injuries. Source

03
February 2015
If you think chiropractors simply “crack” backs, you’re not alone. Scott Duke, D.C., owner of Duke Chiropractic in New York City, is accustomed to hearing this misconception. fix-body-group-chiropractor“Sports chiropractors who are trained in muscle work, such as Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston, are probably the best manual therapists for preventing injury and optimizing performance,” says Duke. “That’s why there’s always a sports chiropractor on Olympic and professional sports teams.” For runners, chiropractic can be used for injury prevention because it emphasizes proper alignment of the spine and pelvis. The most common running-related injuries Duke sees in his patients, which range from recreational runners to Olympians and New York City Marathon winners, are plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, IT Band Syndrome, patella (knee) tracking problems and hip bursitis. Duke’s first step in treating these injuries: Search for misalignment. “Malalignment of the spine can cause unnecessary tension on one particular body part versus an equal distribution of pressure,” he says. “I can’t take care of anyone’s chronic IT band problem without making sure their pelvis is in as perfect alignment as it can be. Otherwise, it’ll continue to wear, tear, and put strain on that one particular body part.”

What Causes Improper Alignment?

Major causes of improper alignment include running in the same direction on the same course every day; running often slanted surfaces, such as a beach; and not replacing shoes every few hundred miles. Fix these training errors that cause misalignment with a few simple tweaks:
  • Vary your running surface—pavement, track, asphalt, grass, dirt, wood chips—a few times a week, and you’ll naturally run on different courses.
  • Run as close to the water as possible when on the beach, as the sand tends to be more flat there.
  • Buy two of the same type of running shoes, and switch between the pairs.
Source

09
October 2013
At Fix Body Group we are bombarded weekly by injuries and trauma to the shoulder, especially the rotator cuff muscles. Most people have heard of injuries and tears to the rotator cuff. Whether you are a Crossfit athlete, baseball fan, desk jockey or weekend warrior in a local gym, everyone fears the rotator cuff and the pain and suffering an injury there is supposed to coincide with. However, as we will describe below, often these injuries are extremely treatable and have a very high success rate, if the proper approach is taken. While by nature, especially compared to the hip or other joints, the shoulder in naturally less stable, these type of injuries are often very preventable and can also be healed very successfully with conservative physical and manual therapy methods. We employ a mix of sports therapies, A.R.T. , massage, and chiropractic work to help re-balance the shoulder by strengthening weak muscles and relieving tightness and scar tissue buildup in tight muscles, ligaments and tendons. Lately, we’ve encountered a number of problems that have to do with one rotator cuff muscle in particular, the subscapularis. The subscapularis, or “subscap” as it’s often called in short, is extremely important for both normal function of the shoulder joint, and also the healing of an injured shoulder. Because it lies beneath the scapula (and thus derives it’s name), and posterior to the rib cage it is very hard to access and treat, except by the most skilled and knowledgeable of therapists. Many doctors, massage therapists and PT’s don’t really know how to access it for manual therapy, and there are few ways to really create a positive response in this muscle otherwise. The subscapularis will become very tight in swimmers, ballplayers, surfers, boxers, Crossfit athletes, and anyone who uses a mouse, keyboard, or steering wheel for long duration. You might know this muscle is affected if you have trouble bringing your arm up overhead and rotating externally, as if winding up to throw a baseball. If you have trouble with these motions please consider getting an assessment to find out if this muscle, or another rotator are compromised. This muscle is not easily stretched or lengthened at home, and is best treated using an advanced manual therapy technique such as Active Release Technique as we do here at Fix Body Group. Many of our desk jockies, Crossfitters, and professional fighters can attest to the powerful change that can be made on this muscle, and ultimately the entire shoulder joint.

10
September 2013
NSAID-List A recent topic in the athletic world is the role of inflammation in healing and adaptation to training. This is particularly of note to our running, cycling, and triathlete patient base that train many hours per week and are constantly at war with inflammation, pain, soreness, and fatigue. This topic is fleshed out in greater detail in an excellent blog linked here: If you don’t have time to read the article (which you really should take the time) I will outline some of the main points. 1. Inflammation is often a desired, and necessary response to injury or training. Without it, adaptation can be less effective. 2. NSAID’s (or Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) inhibit training adaptations in muscle according to research. 3. Recent studies show that anti-inflammatory drugs don’t always reduce pain. This flies in the face of what is commonly believed and thus brings into questions of placebo with NSAID’s. 4. Use of NSAIDs sparingly and in the acute injury phase is recommended. At Fix Body Group we often recommend the use of NSAID’s but the timing and types of issues always are brought into play in making these decisions. While this must always be dealt with on a case-by-case basis, we generally approve of the suggestions in this blog. Using NSAID’s (and let’s not forget ICE!) in the acute but not chronic phase of injury is recommended. Icing as done by many runners and endurance athletes such as ice baths, along with use of NSAID’s to treat general training soreness is not recommended. This goes hand in hand with what the elite athletes I’ve worked with for years are doing. Elite athletes often take doses of NSAID’s and use ice baths during competitions, so that they can prepare for the next round or day without care for training response from the event. In training they typically limit or avoid these practices to allow their body maximum adaptation to the training stimulus. Remember, soreness is a good thing in training, it means you have taxed the fibers and musculoskeletal system. Soreness can also be thought of as a governor, forcing your body to slow down for a few days until both the metabolic, nervous, and musculoskeletal systems are recovered and ready for more. If you acquire a simple ache, tendon injury or something that is more than general soreness consult with your health care professional and generally some advil for about three days would be a good idea. If you have questions about different kinds of soreness or what you should do in these scenarios please leave comments below or call to speak to one of our providers. Happy training!