29
Jul 2015
Workout routine killing your back?

Chiropractors agree it’s paramount to keep your spine safe in the gym, and recommend adding these basic back-saving exercises to your routine before your lift session.  Still not sure? Come into FIX Body Group for more information or give us a call today!

 

There are thousands of reasons to work out. Maybe you want to lose weight or bulk up. Maybe you want to have more energy. Or maybe you just want to keep up with your kids. Whatever your motivation, you expect to feel better after the gym.

 

So why does your back hurt so damn much?

 

Turns out, the thing that’s suppose to keep you healthy—exercise—may be to blame for your pain, says Stuart McGill, Ph.D., professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo in Ontario and the author of Ultimate Back Fitness and Performance.


“Coach potatoes typically don’t get back pain,” says McGill. “It’s a problem for the desk jockey who works out.

 

It sounds illogical. After all, you’re building strength at the gym so you don’t get hurt. So why can increasing your fitness ultimately decrease your back health?

 

Say you head to the gym for an hour every day. Whenever you pick up a weight—light or heavy—the vertebrae in your spine compress under the load, says McGill. That’s no big deal—as long as you don’t sit for hours before and after the workout.

 

But if you’re like most men in today’s world, you probably sit—at work, in a car, on the couch—for extended periods. Your spine is flexed a large portion of the day. Then, at the gym, you perform loaded exercises like the deadlift, squat, kettlebellswing, or shoulder press. If your back rounds at all during those exercises, you’re setting yourself up for back trouble.

 

Here’s why: Each vertebral disc in your spine is made of layers of collagen rings with a gel-like nucleus in the middle. When flexed under load, those rings become stressed and begin to loosen up and divide. Do this often enough, and the gel begins to work its way out of those layers, explains McGill.

 

“Imagine your disc like it’s a hamburger with lots of mustard,” says McGill. “When you squeeze the bun on one side, all the mustard shoots out the other.”

 

If you never loaded your spine, the gel would stay safely contained in the tough collagen rings. However, sitting all day, plus flexing your back during exercise causes the nucleus to squeeze through the loosened collagen layers, he says.

 

Eventually, enough gel seeps through creating a disc bulge that presses on a nerve. Your body deals with the pain by initiating an inflammatory response, which can cause muscle spasms and sometimes lead to excruciating pain. Suddenly, it hurts to bend over to tie your shoe.

 

And every time you hurt your back, your body responds by growing vascular tissues—nerves, and little veins and arteries—where the bulge was located. “So you know what? The next time it happens, you’ll feel it even more,” he says.

 

Obviously, stopping exercise isn’t the answer. But you should stop assuming that your current workout staves off pain.

 

“Getting fit doesn’t prevent back pain,” McGill says. “It’s howyou get fit that does.”

 

The Workout


Besides limiting the amount of time you spend sitting, your workout needs to build core stability for maximum protection. “It’s nonnegotiable,” says McGill. A trunk that is stabilized by muscles in the front, the sides, and the back won’t bend under heavy loads or multiple reps. And the stiffer your core, the faster and more powerful your arms and legs will be, he says. You’ll be able to lift more, run quicker, throw faster, punch harder, and kick farther.

 

But you can’t just perform any core routine. You need exercises that are easy on the spinal discs while creating as much stability and endurance as possible, says McGill.

 

Twelve years ago, Men’s Health asked McGill for a back-saving workout, both to relieve current back pain and to reduce your chances of a future back pain. He gave us four exercises—the cat-camel, the bird dog, the side plank, and the McGill curlup—based on his knowledge from working with real-life, active men and professional athletes, as well as authoring hundreds of studies on lower-back injury and rehabilitation.

 

Today, he offers up the same exercises—with a new rep scheme. “It’s hard to improve on something that has such a solid, scientific foundation to begin with,” McGill says. “The exercises hit the front, back, and sides of your core, while removing gravity and supporting your spine at both ends.” Watch the video below to see how to perform all four movements.

 

McGill recommends adding these exercises before your usual workout.  “We’ve recently found that if you do these exercises, you’ll actually feel tighter and stiffer in your core for a period of time afterward,” he says.

 

Start watching your back. Click here to see the four exercises you should add to your routine today to prevent a back attack tomorrow (Source).

 

28
Jul 2015

 

Men: eat these foods!

 

Take a moment to examine your own eating habits and think about adding these foods to your regimen – or increasing their intake – to keep your body at peak performance and health.

 

Guys, in order to keep your system working efficiently, you need to remember to fuel your body with the right nutrients. The right foods can improve heart health, eye health, brain health, and reproductive health. Aging is associated with gradual declines in most of your body systems (happens with everyone). These declines may increase your risk for having a heart attack, stroke, certain cancers (lung and prostate), or the development of Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s.

 

However, the foods listed below are chock full of nutrition and may keep your body, organs, and your brain working at optimal levels.

 

 

Health Booster #1: Clams, Scallops, Oysters

 

Clams, Scallops, and Oysters are part of the mollusk family, which can be found on land, in the deep blue sea, or in many lakes around the country. These tiny little creatures are packed full of nutrition and are very low in calories. For example, three ounces of scallops packs a whopping 14 grams of protein and is roughly 75 calories.

 

Plus, scallops, clams, muscles, and oysters are packed full of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential fats your body needs every day to maintain proper health. Also these tiny creatures of the sea are loaded with important nutrients, such as zinc, manganese, and phosphorus, which could help maintain normal blood sugar levels and improve your immune system.

 

Health Booster #2: Fatty Fish

 

Fatty fish (salmon, tuna, herring, sardines, etc.) are perfect for not only shrinking your waistline, but also for improving your heart, brain, and eye health. Fatty fish are chock full of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to reduce inflammation, which could halt the progression of many chronic diseases. Not only that, but fatty fish contain high-quality protein and are low in calories.

 

Compared to a piece of red meat, a piece of salmon has less saturated fat plus a good helping of omega-3 fatty acids. Mixing the omega-3 fatty acids with a natural source of Vitamin D, fatty fish could take the proverbial cake in healthy nutrition. Worried about PCBs and mercury? The smaller fish, like sardines, are a great source of low-fat, high-quality protein, and are very low in mercury or PCBs, which have been shown detrimental to your health.

 

Health Booster #3: Oats or Oatmeal

 

Steel-cut oats are a perfect source of complex carbs, protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Of course you know that fiber is good for your health, but did you know that oats, which naturally contain beta-glucan, have been shown to be a great source of fiber? Beta-glucan is a naturally occurring fiber that, when introduced to your body, has been shown to lower cholesterol, blood pressure, weight, and help improve blood sugar levels – which could protect your heart, digestive, and overall health. Plus, the fiber in oats has been shown to decrease appetite and could lower energy intake at meals throughout your day (lunch and dinner).

 

Oats are full of minerals like tryptophan, manganese, and phosphorus, plus they have a good serving of B vitamins. Having a cup of oats in the morning could leave you feeling full all day, which could reduce your belly fat, therefore potentially improving your health.

 

Health Booster #4: Mushrooms

 

As strange as it may sound, including more mushrooms in your diet could improve your health as you get older. Mushrooms, in all varieties, deliver a big plate of nutrients in a tiny, bite size fungus. Mushrooms have been shown to be an immune system stimulant, plus they have also been shown to fight or prevent certain types of cancer.

 

Mushrooms are also a great source of the B vitamins – B2, B3, and B5 – which could be beneficial in mood, blood sugar control, energy levels, and cholesterol levels, just to name a few. Plus, mushrooms have plenty of minerals that are necessary for your body to function at its best.

 

Health Booster #5: Tomatoes

 

Tomatoes, another low-calorie favorite, are full of heart-healthy vitamins and minerals. Tomatoes have high levels of the antioxidant lycopene, which has been shown to reduce your risk for cancers, heart disease, and could boost sperm count. Yes, lycopene, according to some research, could be important for increasing your sperm concentration.

 

Plus, this tasty little vegetable has plenty of phenolic acid, which has been shown to prevent some instances of lung cancer. One more benefit of tomatoes: they are available year-round, which means you can get plenty of lycopene at all times and seasons of the year.

 

Start Improving Your Health

 

Aging can be associated with a decline in health – from heart health, brain health, and everything in between. However, taking the right steps now, exercise and stress relief, plus including these five essential foods, could protect your health and lead to a longer, healthier life.


Read this article in it’s entirety at MyFitnessHub.blogspot.com

25
Jul 2015
What's for breakfast?

Breakfast has been hailed as the most important meal of the day – so are putting the right plate together in the morning?

 

Are you struggling to keep your energy up throughout the day? Or do you usually have a mid-afternoon crash and don’t understand why? This could be due to a hurried or botched breakfast. I’ve found that with a few tweaks to that first meal of the day, you can feel good all day. Here’s what to avoid:

 

1. Bad Coffee
Coffee has both fueled my entrepreneurial ventures and constantly led to crashes and prolonged fatigue. After experiencing many of these ups and downs, I decided to dig into the biochemistry of coffee and the agricultural and economic research. I discovered that all coffee is not the same, and that coffee often carries naturally occurring mold toxins. It turned out that my bad reactions had nothing to do with the coffee; it was a reaction to the mold on the coffee.

 

Now, you won’t see this mold — it’s an invisible byproduct of shortcuts coffee producers take. One study showed that over ninety percent of green coffee beans were contaminated with mold before processing, while another revealed that almost fifty percent of brewed coffees are moldy. When you brew or buy that first cup in the morning, avoid cheaper types of coffee. These cost less because they not only use lower-quality beans but also include a higher percentage of damaged (moldy) beans. And avoid decaf coffee, which contains more mold on average than caffeinated, partly because coffee people cringe at the thought of ruining high quality beans with decaf processing and therefore use lower quality beans to make decaf.

 

2. Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese, But Not Butter
The main problem with dairy is the harmful process of pasteurization. While this process does reduce the small risk of milk contamination, it kills off the beneficial probiotics in the milk, denatures milk proteins, and transforms milk from a source of nutrition into a source of many health problems. Pasteurization also turns milk’s lactose sugars into beta-lactose sugars that the body absorbs faster, causing blood sugar spikes.

 

In the morning, you should avoid milk and most things made from milk — cheese, yogurt, cream, buttermilk, and ice cream — but not butter. Butter is significantly healthier than the milk it is made from because the harmful milk proteins (including casein and BCM-7) are largely absent from butter. What little milk protein remains in cultured butter has been enzymatically modified during the butter fermentation process and isn’t a problem for most people.

 

3. Sugar, Including Fruit
Your body needs more sodium than potassium in the morning so your blood pressure can go up, but eating fruit (which has a lot of potassium) for breakfast causes your blood pressure to go down. Low blood pressure in the morning makes it harder to feel energized and ready to face the day. Most people are familiar with the term “sugar crash,” but many don’t know where this term comes from. After you eat sugar, it’s not only your focus and energy that crashes, but also your actual blood sugar levels, too. When you eat sugar, blood sugars naturally rise, causing the pancreas to secrete insulin. But the pancreas isn’t great at estimating how much insulin to release and usually overdoes it, secreting large amounts of insulin that cause your blood sugar to drop dramatically. This is the famous crash that causes brain fog, sluggishness, and food cravings. Eliminating sugar is one of the very best things you can do for your health, weight, and overall performance.

 

4. All Grains
Gluten-containing grains are actually addictive. They break down in the gut into opioid compounds called gluteomorphins that trigger the same receptors in your brain as other opiate drugs like heroin. If you allow your brain to get “addicted” to the opiates formed by grain digestion, you’re going to experience insatiable hunger and cravings that last for days after you last ate those grains.

 

There is plenty of research to show that eating gluten also has negative health consequences. It causes inflammation and gastrointestinal distress and contributes to autoimmune diseases and a host of other issues. The trick is to give it up completely. The gluten breakfast foods to avoid include cereal, toast, pancakes, and granola bars. This will dramatically increase your ability to live up to your full potential and you’ll undoubtedly feel an immediate difference in your body and your brain.



So what can you eat instead? Click here to go to AskMen.com and find out!

24
Jul 2015
Maximize!

Are you getting the most out of those precious few moments that you’re setting aside every day for your workout?

 

If you feel like your workout program isn’t giving you the results you were hoping for, now is the time to make some changes. Some basic shifts in the way you approach your workout can make a drastic difference, so take a few moments to consider these 10 simple ways to improve your exercise sessions.

 

1. Change Your Diet
The food that you eat is the fuel in your body’s gas tank, and if you are not eating right, you will not be able to exercise right. Eat nutritious meals at the same time each day, keep snacking to a minimum, and avoid junk food.

 

2. Get Motivated
Everyone has their own ways to get motivated to exercise. You may find that making a playlist of your favorite songs gets you pumped up at the gym. When you are feeling lazy, try to power through it. Once your blood starts flowing, you will find the energy you need.

 

3. Have Fun!
One of the most effective ways to improve your overall fitness is to simply enjoy yourself. When you look forward to exercising, the results will come on their own without you even thinking about it. Join an exercise class that you can get excited about – Spinning is a great example. Get together with friends and play a game of softball. Do anything that keeps you active and having fun.

 

4. Incorporate Exercise Into Your Routine
True fitness is a lifestyle, not just something you do when you are at the gym. Consider jogging to work instead of driving. Conquer the stairs instead of opting for the elevator. If you look for little opportunities to get your heart beating, your workout sessions will reflect that.

 

5. Make Your Workout Program a Priority
Far too many people view exercise as something to do when boredom hits, or when the schedule happens to be free.  You need to make your daily workout program higher on the list of priorities if you want to see real results. Don’t put it off until tomorrow – do it today!

 

6. Track Your Progress
You should keep track of your progress so that you can be sure that your current workout plan is in fact working. If you are not satisfied with your results, don’t get discouraged. Make some changes, and see what works and what doesn’t. Fitness is a lifestyle that people spend their whole lives mastering, so stay focused on the long term.

 

7. Vary Your Workouts
Keep it interesting! If you go to the same machine at the gym day after day, it is going to lose its appeal fast. Get out of your comfort zone and try something new. Sign up for an indoor cycling class or sit in on a yoga class. Take a jog through a new part of your neighborhood. You are more likely to keep up with your workout if you keep it fresh.

 

8. Stretch
Never start working out unless you have stretched thoroughly. If you do not stretch, your performance will suffer and you will not get the most out of your time spend. More importantly, not stretching can cause an injury that can put you out of commission for an extended period of time, setting you back further.

 

9. Meet Like-Minded People
If you don’t have a gym buddy, try to meet some people who have similar fitness goals to you. Joining a community is a great way to get inspired, and having a friend working out alongside you is a powerful motivational tool. A workout partner helps you to stay accountable and pushes you to achieve your true potential.

 

10. Start Now
 It is never too late to start improving your life. Stop thinking about it and get out there and do it. If you feel any hesitation, you need to push through that and start this positive lifelong journey today. While the best time to start exercising regularly may have been 10 years ago, the second best time is right now.

 

Source: InstallingMuscles.com

21
Jul 2015
Shin Splints Be Gone!

Shin Splints are a runner’s worst nightmare and can put you off your game for weeks – but try this to stop them before they even start.

 

Shin splints, or medial tibial stress syndrome, is a painful inflammatory condition marked by nagging pain across the tibia — the large bone in the front of the lower leg (a.k.a. the shinbone).

 

The pain is caused by overuse or injury to the fibers that connect the soleus (one of the calf muscles) to the tibia, explains Francesca Conte, PhD, a pro ultramarathoner, running coach, race director, and co-owner of Bad to the Bone Endurance Sports in Charlottesville, Va.

 

Although many people experience shin splints after running, the running itself might not be the cause. Rather, heavy heel-striking, downhill striding, poor form, or ramping up your workouts too quickly — going from couch to 5K in one day, for instance — can all be factors.

 

To help stave off shin splints, Conte recommends doing the following exercises three times a week to stretch and strengthen the lower-leg muscles.

 

CALF RAISES

  • Standing with the balls of your feet on a step or sturdy box, drop your heels until they fall below the step.
  • Reverse the movement, rising to your tiptoes.
  • Perform one to three sets of 10 reps, resting one minute between sets.


TOE CURLS

  • While standing or seated, place a towel under your bare feet.
  • Curl your toes around the towel, then release.
  • Repeat for about one minute, then rest.
  • Continue with one minute on, one minute off for as long as you comfortably can, for up to 30 minutes.


ONE-LEGGED BRIDGE

  • Lying on your back with your knees bent and feet on the ground, raise your hipsuntil they form a straight line between your shoulders and knees.
  • Extend one leg in line with your knee and hold the position for 10 seconds, or as long as you can with proper form.
  • Return your foot to the floor, and repeat the exercise on the other side.
  • Repeat three times per leg, alternating sides and resting as needed. Work up to holding each rep for 30 seconds.


Source: Experience Life (click here for picture tutorials)

12
Jul 2015
Chiropractors get results!

Every athlete can benefit from regular trips to the chiropractor – and here’s 8 sport-specific reasons to go frequently.

 

During its 100-year history in America, chiropractic has gained steady acceptance for easing a wide array of physical ailments. The American Chiropractic Association describes chiropractic as a form of health care that focuses on musculoskeletal and nervous systems disorders and numerous studies support their assessment. Chiropractic is common in sports medicine and many trainers will encourage it before, during, and after any physical performance. Let’s take a look at a few examples of how chiropractic has benefited the sports world.

 

1. Solid Body Maintenance in Professional Football
It’s no secret that professional football is a beast of a game and injuries are frequent. Even if football players avoid serious injury, it’s a sure bet that stiffness and soreness are just par for the course. In a 2002 survey, thirty-one percent of football teams in the National Football League reported having a chiropractor on staff. Athletes reported using chiropractic care quite frequently, noting its effectiveness.

 

2. Improved Mobility in College Football
Osteopathic manipulative treatment, or OMT, is one of the main forms of chiropractic therapy used in sports medicine. The main goal with OMT is to promote flexibility and pain-free movement. Football players often rely on OMT as a preventative measure against injuries. A 2012 Virginia Tech study showed that OMT positively impacted sports performance in both offensive and defensive Virginia Tech football players. Most football players also reported a self-assessed improvement in athletic performance after OMT sessions.

 

3. Helpful for Hockey Injuries
Like football, ice hockey is a full-contact sport and injuries are common. Chiropractic has been shown to reduce painful symptoms of recurrent shoulder instability related to hockey injuries.

 

4. Relief for Sports Hernia
Five to twenty percent of all sports injuries involve groin pain. However, it’s not always the result of a line drive baseball. One of the most common causes of groin pain in athletes is athletic pubalgia, commonly referred to as sports hernia. [5] A study showed that soccer players who experienced sports hernia were relieved of discomfort following 8 weeks of a combination therapy that consisted of chiropractic care and rehabilitation exercises.

 

5. Increased Strength in Martial Arts
Although mainly used for alleviating muscular and skeletal complaints, it seems thatchiropractic can also promote physical strength. [7] [8] [9] In one study, national level judo athletes showed a 16% improvement in grip strength after undergoing only three chiropractic sessions.

 

6. Support for All Olympic Athletes
For years, chiropractors have worked with world-class Olympic athletes to improve their strength, endurance, and range of motion while training. Olympic athletes also receive chiropractic care at the games. One particular set of games often overlooked at the Olympics is the Paralympics. These games include professional athletes with some type of physical disability who also use chiropractic care to enhance performance and overcome minor injuries. [11]

 

7. Soothes Tennis Elbow
A whopping 50 percent of tennis players can expect to get tennis elbow during their lifetime, and one-third of tennis players will experience it in severe fashion. The main goals of chiropractic therapy for tennis elbow is to relieve discomfort and redness, promote healing, rehabilitate the injured arm, and avoid recurrence. [12] Specific joint manipulation performed by a chiropractor has shown to be effective for discomfort associated with tennis elbow.

 

8. Keeps Baseball Players Swinging
Baseball is a game that demands quick bursts of energy. Whether it’s running the bases or swinging the bat, these fast-moving activities often come with rotator cuff injuries, neck pain, back strains, and hamstring pulls. Studies have shown that chiropractic helps prevent hamstring and other lower limb injuries in baseball players. [13] Another study revealed that muscle strength and long jump distance was greatly improved in baseball players who received regular chiropractic adjustments.

 

Receiving the Benefits of Chiropractic
There’s no question that chiropractic care is a fantastic method of mechanical maintenance that has repeatedly been shown to benefit the machine that is the body of an athlete (and soldiers!). Are you an athlete who incorporates chiropractic care into your health and wellness plan? Please leave a comment and share your experience of the difference chiropractic has made for you!

 

Source

10
Jul 2015
How much rest is best?

When it come to working out, knowing just how much time to let your body recover between workout sessions is paramount.

 

For skinny guys and girls who are looking to pack on rock solid muscle mass getting your nutrition plans and exercise routines worked out is hugely important…but what’s also probably as important is knowing exactly how often you should be training and how much rest you are getting between workouts.

 

Many folks fall into the trap of either overtraining or undertraining since they haven’t placed enough of a priority on workout scheduling…and so end up either pushing their muscles too much or not pushing them enough.

 

Here we’re going to take a look at how much rest you should be looking to get between your workouts and why ignoring this advice can cause you serious problems in the long run.

 

How Rest Time Can Affect Your Muscle Building Results

 

Rest time can have a large impact on your ability to gain muscle mass, since it is only while we rest that our bodies are able to repair our muscles aiding future growth.

 

Spending every day down the gym, while it may seem like a good idea (the whole “more is better” notion), will actually prevent your muscles from ever fully being able to recover and for you to reach your potential.

 

Not to mention the fact that your workout performance will be poorer and so you won’t be lifting as heavy as you should, and also that you are more liable to suffer injuries due to insufficient rest between workouts…

 

Continue reading at musclebuildingtrainingtips.com!

05
Jul 2015
Use that bodyweight!

For the times you don’t have access to a gym, don’t want to pay that membership fee – or are even looking to bust through a strength training plateau.

 

Maybe you need to skip your usual gym workout and work out at home instead, or maybe you’re traveling for weeks or months and won’t have much gym or outdoor fitness park access while you’re away.

 

As you can see, whether you’re used to using much equipment in your workouts or not, there will always be times when you’ll want to be able to do without.

 

And though you can definitely get a really good workout in using no equipment at all, one of the main reasons I tend to use equipment (especially when I’m at home in my normal routine), is that it helps to mix up my workouts and keep them interesting. It’s fun for me to think of different ways to incorporate some of my favorite pieces of equipment such as plyo boxes, medicine balls, pull up bars, and dip bars or parallel bars into my workouts, and always keeps them challenging.

 

But that doesn’t mean you can’t still get in a good workout when you don’t have equipment available. A few simple substitutions and a bit of creativity guarantees that you can always get an awesome workout in, no matter what you have available. No excuses!

 

Continue to 12 Minute Athlete for their 15 Awesome Bodyweight Substitutions For Equipment-Based Exercises:

03
Jul 2015
29
Jun 2015

Inactivity = Strength Losses!

Did you know after just two weeks of inactivity younger athletes will lose up to a third of their muscular strength in their legs? And it doesn’t get much happier for the older crowd, either!

 

New research reveals that it only takes two weeks of not using their legs for young people to lose a third of their muscular strength, leaving them on par with a person who is 40-50 years their senior. The Center for Healthy Aging and the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen conducted the research.

 

Time and again, we are told that we need to stay physically active and exercise daily. But how quickly do we actually lose our muscular strength and muscle mass if we go from being averagely active to being highly inactive? For example when we are injured, fall ill or simply take a very relaxing holiday. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have examined what happens to the muscles in younger and older men after a period of high inactivity, by way of so-called immobilization with a leg pad.

 

Both older and younger people lose muscular strength

 

“Our experiments reveal that inactivity affects the muscular strength in young and older men equally. Having had one leg immobilized for two weeks, young people lose up to a third of their muscular strength, while older people lose approx. one fourth. A young man who is immobilized for two weeks loses muscular strength in his leg equivalent to aging by 40 or 50 years,” says Andreas Vigelsoe, PhD at the Center for Healthy Aging and the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen.

 

Young people lose twice as much muscle mass

 

With age, our total muscle mass diminishes, which is why young men have approx. one kilogram more muscle mass in each leg than older men. Both groups lose muscle mass when immobilized for two weeks — young men lose 485 grams on average, while older men lose approx. 250 grams. The participants’ physical fitness was also reduced while their one leg was immobilized in a pad.

 

“The more muscle mass you have, the more you’ll lose. Which means that if you’re fit and become injured, you’ll most likely lose more muscle mass than someone who is unfit, over the same period of time. But even though older people lose less muscle mass and their level of fitness is reduced slightly less than in young people, the loss of muscle mass is presumably more critical for older people, because it is likely to have a greater impact on their general health and quality of life,” says Martin Gram, researcher at the Center for Healthy Aging and the Department of Biomedical Sciences, explains.

 

Cycling is not enough

 

After two weeks of immobilization, the participants bicycle-trained 3-4 times a week for six weeks.

 

“Unfortunately, bicycle-training is not enough for the participants to regain their original muscular strength. Cycling is, however, sufficient to help people regain lost muscle mass and reach their former fitness level. If you want to regain your muscular strength following a period of inactivity; you need to include weight training,” Andreas Vigelsoe states.

 

“It’s interesting that inactivity causes such rapid loss of muscle mass, in fact it’ll take you three times the amount of time you were inactive to regain the muscle mass that you’ve lost. This may be caused by the fact that when we’re inactive, it’s 24 hours a day,” Martin Gram concludes.

 

Source