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26
May 2017
Woman under Stress - Personal Training San Diego

When we say stress, we often mean emotional stress caused by various personal issues, family troubles, work-related stress, etc. However, there are different types of stress and also different ways to manage it. Regardless of the type of stress, there’s no denying that physical exercise is vital in stress management.

 

Take a look at the breakdown of different types of stress and what you can do to secure the well-being of your body and mind.

Acute stress

The most common type of stress, acute stress is a biological reaction to new challenges or demands. As an immediate reaction, acute stress can be triggered by everyday situations, such as an argument at home or work, or a traffic jam, or less frequent events such as a change of job or moving to another city.

 

As long as these ‘’episodes’’ of acute stress are isolated, there should be no permanent health problems. Nevertheless, the greater frequency and intensity of acute stress may indicate acute stress disorder or what is better known as episodic acute stress, in which case you should consult your doctor for suitable treatment.

 

Acute stress can be mitigated by regular physical exercise, a healthy and socially appropriate way to ‘’let off steam’’ and relieve the body of the tension accumulated during the day. You can’t get rid of stress completely because it’s mostly caused by external factors, and you can’t possibly eliminate them all. But, you can take care of your body by eating healthily and doing exercise to minimize the effects the stress will have on your organism.

Chronic stress

If acute stress persists for longer periods of time and seems to be getting more intense, it’s a sign of chronic stress. This type of stress is usually caused by more deeply rooted issues such as an abusive or otherwise bad relationship, dysfunctional family, bad financial situation, etc. Chronic stress is extremely dangerous because it ultimately leads to health issues such as cancer and heart disease.

 

The best thing to do is to do your best to prevent chronic stress altogether. If your job is making you miserable, you should change it. Where possible, get away from the things that are causing you stress.

 

Taking care of your body is equally important. Treat yourself to relaxing massages and other treatments to ease the built-up tension. Let your body help heal your mind.

Physical Stress

Most of the population leads a sedentary lifestyle, sitting at the computer all day long. Children play video games or are overweight. All of these things, combined with an unbalanced diet and the lack of physical exercise, cause what we can physical stress.

 

This type of stress can compromise the well-being of your entire body. For example, bad posture and lack or muscle support for the spine can cause migraines and ultimately compromise the nervous system.

 

If you don’t take care of your body, the effects will inevitably spread to your mind. The lack of physical strength will make you drowsy and irritable, unable to focus on your daily tasks, or worse.

 

If you have been in an accident or suffered a bodily injury, the trauma can cause a significant amount of stress. Rehabilitation is crucial to your recovery, both physical and emotional. At Fix Body Group, our rehabilitation therapists can help you improve posture, alleviate pain and improve strength through corrective exercises, stretching training and active release technique.

Chemical Stress

Did you know that your diet and the environment you live in can contribute to yet another type of stress known as chemical stress? Our body is a complex organism and everything is interconnected. Eating unhealthily, being exposed to pollution and smog, smoking, recreational drug use – all are wearing your system down slowly, but persistently.

 

You should eliminate these chemical stressors as much as you can. If you live in a polluted environment, you should get some fresh air as often as possible. Remember – you should love your body and always do what’s best to preserve its healthy state. A balanced diet and an optimal amount of physical exercise are a good place to start.

Personal training in San Diego

Just like there are different types of stress, some of which very individual in nature, that’s how the approach to manage it should be personalized. At Fix Body Group, we recognize the importance of physical exercise in stress management. Our personal training programs are tailor-made to suit your needs. There are no cookie-cutter workouts, only targeted exercises to help you achieve your goals and take care of your body.

 

Contact San Diego’s best Personal Trainers today for more info and personalized advice!

13
Dec 2015
bigstock-Man-With-Impaired-Posture-Posi-67397755-1068x712

We all know that our patients are doing good things for their bodies while we are with them, but probably not during the other hours of the week. Especially the prolonged time they potentially spend sitting which is no considered detrimental to their health. As healthcare professionals we see the effects of this everyday in the form of poor posture however we continue to overlook it as something benign that naturally occurs over time without consequence. According to the American Journal of Pain Management “Posture effects and moderates every physiological function from breathing to hormonal production. Spinal pain, headache, mood, blood pressure, pulse, and lung capacity are among the functions most easily influenced by posture.” (1) There is also evidence that poor thoracic posture shows “a trend towards greater mortality” as discussed in a study by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2)

Another fairly new risk factor that is starting to become more common is excessive usage of mobile phones, tablets and PCs. Over the past seven years mobile device usage has grown from .3 hours a day to 2.8 hours a day for the average adult. Comparatively our computer use has remained about the same over the same time period at 2.4 hours per day. (3) A recent article by Kenneth Hansraj, MD the chief of Spine Surgery at New York Spine Surgery and Rehabilitation describes that as the head tilts forward its weight effectively goes from 10 to 12 pounds in the neutral position to as much as 60 pounds at 60 degrees of flexion, which is the typical position that we have while using a mobile device. (4)

Over time this forward head position leads to ligamentous creep deformation having lasting neurophysiological effects. This was demonstrated with a feline study that found the creep deformation that occurred over the first 30 minutes did not recover with 10 minutes of rest and was present up to seven hours later. (5)

The other finding of this research was even more alarming: the primary risk factor was not the load but rather the duration of the load. The implication of this is concerning given we spend an average of 2.8 hours a day using our mobile device.

In addition to the ligamentous deformation, muscle adaptations occur resulting in the ‘Upper Cross Syndrome’ as described by Janda. The UCS is characterized by tightness of the upper trapezius, levator scapula and pectoral muscles along with weakness of the deep cervical flexors and middle to lower trapezius muscles.

As these postural changes occur with the neck and upper body, our lower body becomes susceptible to adaptions as well. These include weakened back muscles as evident in a study by Sanches-Zuriaga that found a decrease in low back muscle activation after soft tissue creep, suggesting that prolonged or repeated flexion could increase the risk of injury. (6) These findings support the fact that prolonged sitting should be interrupted with breaks in order to decrease this risk along with exercise intervention.

For the purpose of this article the focus will be on the Active Subsystem (spinal muscles) as described by Panjabi in his spinal stability system model. The following five exercises can be used for most clients requiring minimal time and no equipment. These exercises will not only help with preventing the above-described deformation and adaptation risks, but also encourage clients to stand up regularly and perform mini exercise breaks throughout the day.

We will start with the forward head posture as described by Harman and colleagues who found that this position is associated with weakness of the deep cervical flexor and mid thoracic scapular retraction muscles. (7) Additionally, shortening of the opposing cervical extensors and pectoral muscles was also noted. A combination of strengthening exercises for the deep cervical flexors and scapular retraction muscles coupled with stretching of the cervical extensor and pectoral muscles was performed for 10 weeks. The findings of the study demonstrated that a short, home-based targeted exercise program can improve the postural alignment related to forward head posture.

Based on the above findings the following three upper body exercises are suggested given they are ‘low-barrier’ homework for clients that they can perform daily without any equipment.

As described earlier, prolonged sitting and its effect on posture is not limited to the upper body alone but also affects the lower body. Tightness of the hip flexors along with an inhibition of the extensor muscles can lead to an aberrant motor pattern know as “gluteal amnesia” according to McGill. (8) He recommends exercises to enhance gluteal muscle function to unload the back in additional to hip flexor mobility with specific psoas muscle targeting.

Based on the above findings the following three upper body exercises are suggested given they are ‘low-barrier’ homework for clients that they can perform daily without any equipment:

 

Head Retraction

Head-retraction_2Begin seated, or standing, looking forward with shoulders back with good neutral posture. Activate core muscles. Attempt to draw head directly backwards. Maintain level head position. Do not tilt head up or down. Hold for two seconds. Return to start position. Beginners should start with 3 sets of 10 repetitions.

 

Shoulder Retraction
Begin standing in good posture. Shoulders should be back and head up. Bend elbows to Scap-retraction_1-90 degrees and keep elbows near sides. While maintaining good posture, draw shoulders back squeezing shoulder blades together. A stretch may be felt in the chest and front of shoulder. Do not allow shoulders to raise upward. Hold for 5-10 seconds. Beginners should start with 3 sets of 5 repetitions.

 

 

 

 

Doorway Chest Stretch

Place forearm on wall, or doorway, with elbow bent at 90º. Elbows should be slightly

Chest-Stretch-1below shoulder level. While maintaining forearm contact, lean body into doorway until gentle stretch is felt in the chest and shoulder. Hold for 20-30 seconds. Beginners should start with 3 repetitions on each side.

As described earlier, prolonged sitting and its effect on posture is not limited to the upper body alone but also affects the lower body. Tightness of the hip flexors along with an inhibition of the extensor muscles can lead to an aberrant motor pattern know as “gluteal amnesia” according to McGill. (8) He recommends exercises to enhance gluteal muscle function to unload the back in additional to hip flexor mobility with specific psoas muscle targeting.

Here two very effective and easy to perform exercises that clients can do during short exercise breaks throughout the day:

Standing Hip Flexor Stretch
Begin standing in front of a chair about 18 inches away. Place one foot flat on the chairHip-flexor_1seat. Slowly allow hips to glide slightly forward until a gentle stretch is felt on the front of straight leg. Hold for 20-30 seconds. Beginners should aim for 3 sets each on each side.

 

 

 

 

Glute Hip Bridge

Begin lying on floor, facing up. Bend knees so feet are firmly on floor and arms extended

  1. HP1214_2to sides. Activate core muscles. Lift hips off floor to attain a bridge position with knees, hips, and shoulders in alignment. Slowly return to start position. Repeat for prescribed repetitions and sets. Initially, you may develop some cramping in the back of the thigh. A simple hamstring stretch, before and after, may prevent this from occurring. Beginners should aim for 3 sets.

All of the above displayed exercises are easy to execute and include minimal risks if performed as prescribed. Most important here is the regular execution and mid- to long-term adherence to the program. A calendar that reminds clients of the exercises and allows them to check off performed sets and reps could be a nice motivation for them and helps you track their compliance.

13
Oct 2015
LEMON

Lemons are vitamin C rich citrus fruits that enhance your beauty, by rejuvenating skin from within bringing a glow to your face. One of the major health benefits of drinking warm lemon water is that it paves way for losing weight faster, thus acting as a great weight loss remedy.

Lemon water flushes out toxins and is extremely beneficial for the body.


Warm lemon water serves as the perfect ‘good morning drink’, as it aids the digestive system and makes the process of eliminating the waste products from the body easier. It prevents the problem of constipation and diarrhea, by ensuring smooth bowel functions.

Nutritional Value Of Lemons

A glass of lemon juice contains less than 25 calories. It is a rich source of nutrients like calcium, potassium, vitamin C and pectin fiber. It also has medicinal values and antibacterial properties. It also contains traces of iron and vitamin A.

Lemon, a fruit popular for its therapeutic properties, helps maintain your immune system and thus, protects you from the clutches of most types of infections. It also plays the role of a blood purifier. Lemon is a fabulous antiseptic and lime-water juice also works wonders for people having heart problems, owing to its high potassium content. So, make it a part of your daily routine to drink a glass of warm lemon water in the morning and enjoy its health benefits. Read on for more interesting information on the benefits of warm lemon water.

16 Health Benefits Of Drinking Warm Lemon Water

    • Lemon is an excellent and rich source of vitamin C, an essential nutrient that protects the body against immune system deficiencies

    • Lemons contain pectin fiber which is very beneficial for colon health and also serves as a powerful antibacterial

    • It balances maintain the pH levels in the body

    • Having warm lemon juice early in the morning helps flush out toxins

    • It aids digestion and encourages the production of bile

    • It is also a great source citric acid, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium

    • It helps prevent the growth and multiplication of pathogenic bacteria that cause infections and diseases

    • It helps reducing pain and inflammation in joints and knees as it dissolves uric acid

    • It helps cure the common cold

    • The potassium content in lemon helps nourish brain and nerve cells

    • It strengthens the liver by providing energy to the liver enzymes when they are too dilute

    • It helps balance the calcium and oxygen levels in the liver In case of a heart burn, taking a glass of concentrated lemon juice can give relief

    • It is of immense benefit to the skin and it prevents the formation of wrinkles and acne

 

  • It helps maintain the health of the eyes and helps fight against eye problems

  • Aids in the production of digestive juices

  • Lemon juice helps replenish body salts especially after a strenuous workout session

 

Packed with all the goodness, make it a point to begin your day with a glass of warm lemon water. Its cleansing and healing effects will have positive effects on your health in the long run. However it is very important to note that when lemon juice  comes directly in contact with the teeth, can ruin the enamel on the teeth. Hence, it is advised to consume it diluted and also rinse your mouth thoroughly after drinking lemon juice.


02
Oct 2015
foam roller

INJURY PREVENTION & RECOVERY
Use Your Foam Roller the Right Way
Don’t overdo it with the self-massage tool.
By Carl Leivers


Despite the foam roller’s popularity, Richard Hansen, a Boulder, Colorado-based sports chiropractor, says it “shouldn’t be considered the silver bullet for at-home therapy.” Hansen, who treats recreational runners as well as Olympians, warns that incorrect use may cause muscle damage.

Follow these guidelines to use the foam roller safely and effectively:

Roll For Recovery, Not to Treat Injuries

Rolling an injured area can aggravate damaged muscle tissue, particularly in the first few days after the injury. The foam roller is more effective at assisting recovery. It stimulates blood flow, breaks up scar tissue, and helps increase the muscle’s range of motion.
Keep It Light

Aggressive foam roller use may feel good, but it can override your pain sensation. When that happens, it’s possible to use too much pressure or work too long on a particular muscle. “Just because it hurts doesn’t mean it’s more effective,” Hansen says. “It’s better to underwork tissue than overwork it.” Make sure to avoid bony areas and places where tendons attach. If you’re dealing with IT band syndrome, focus on the middle, not the insertion points of the knee and hip tendons.
Time It

Hansen recommends using the foam roller after your workout, rather than before. Begin by lightly foam rolling an area for 30 seconds, then gently stretch the area for 10 seconds. You can repeat that cycle up to three times on each body area. Hansen says that the foam roller should be just one piece of your recovery process, not your only “go-to” technique.

21
Sep 2015
fixbodygroupanklesprain
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS

Tens of thousands of Americans sprain an ankle every year. But ankle sprains get little respect, with most of us shrugging off the injury as inconsequential and soon returning to normal activities.

Several new studies in people and animals, however, suggest that the effects of even a single sprained ankle could be more substantial and lingering than we have supposed, potentially altering how well and often someone moves, for life.

Healthy ankles are, of course, essential for movement.

“The ankle is the base of the body,” said Tricia Hubbard-Turner, a professor of kinesiology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, who led the recent studies. “Everything starts with the ankle.”

But the ankle can be surprisingly fragile and vulnerable to clumsiness (or maybe that’s just me). Step awkwardly off a curb, slide off your high heels, plant a foot wrong while running or playing a sport, and you overstretch or tear the ligaments around the joint and sprain your ankle.

Until recently, few of us worried much about the injury, assuming in most cases that the sprain would fully heal within a week or two, with or without medical attention.

But three new studies, each co-authored by Dr. Hubbard-Turner, raise serious questions about the benignity of ankle sprains.

In the most worrying, since it involves young people, she and her colleagues recruited 20 college students with chronic ankle instability — a condition caused by ankle sprains, in which the ankle easily gives way during movement — and 20 healthy students and asked all of them to wear a pedometer for a week. The researchers controlled for variables like sex, B.M.I. and general health.

It turned out that the students with chronic ankle instability moved significantly less than the other students, taking about 2,000 fewer steps on average each day.

That finding echoed the results of an earlier study by Dr. Hubbard-Turner, although that experiment involved young adult mice. For it, the researchers mildly sprained some of the rodents’ ankles by surgically snipping one of the ligaments on the outside of the joint. They more severely sprained other animals’ joints by snipping two of the ankle ligaments; and performed sham surgery on others to serve as a control group.

Then they let the ligaments heal for several days before giving all of the animals access to running wheels and also testing them for balance by inking their feet and having them skitter along a narrow beam. The researchers could track slips by noting where the colored footprints had slipped off of the beam.

The researchers followed the mice for a year.

At the end of that time, the mice that had undergone sham surgery — whose ankle ligaments had remained untouched — were running significantly more mileage on their wheels than the mice that had had sprains, especially those that had had a severe sprain, even though, presumably, the injury had healed long ago.

The animals with past sprains also continued to slip during balance testing far more often than the control mice. Their balance was impaired and, the researchers concluded, about 70 percent of the mice from the sprain groups had developed the rodent equivalent of chronic ankle instability as a result of a single past sprain.

However, this animal study and that of the college students were relatively short-term. Although mice may be approaching rodent retirement age after a year, that span does not generally represent their entire life, and the researchers wondered whether the past ankle sprain might turn out to affect their life-long movement patterns.

So for another study, this one published last month in The Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, they continued to follow and test the same groups of mice until they passed away from old age, usually within an additional 12 months.

They found that the repercussions of a single ankle sprain lingered throughout the animals’ lives. The mice that had experienced a mild sprain in young adulthood generally continued to run less and more slowly throughout their lives than the animals that had undergone sham surgery, and those that had experienced a severe ankle sprain ran even fewer miles and at the slowest speeds.

“In these animals, a single sprain had led to far more inactivity” throughout their lives than among the animals with intact ankles, Dr. Hubbard-Turner said.

Of course, these were mice, not humans, so it’s impossible to know whether the same decline in lifelong activity occurs in people who sprain an ankle.

But that possibility implies that we should take sore ankles seriously, Dr. Hubbard-Turner said.

“Don’t ignore a sprain,” she said.

If you twist or otherwise hurt your ankle, consult a doctor or physical therapist about diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. And if you have sprained an ankle in the past, even if the injury seems fully healed, consider balance testing by a physical therapist to determine whether you are more wobbly than you suspect.

Finally, if you have never sprained an ankle, pat yourself on the back, preferably while standing on one leg. “Balance training is a good idea for everyone,” Dr. Hubbard-Turner said. (This video has useful balance training tips here.)

The best way to avoid the ramifications of a sprained ankle, she said, “is to not sprain it in the first place.”

07
Aug 2015
Tape it up!

One of our specialties at FIX Body Group, many athletes are reliant on this practice for pain relief and muscular support.



Kinesiology tape is a thin, stretchy, elastic cotton strip with an acrylic adhesive. Therapeutic kinesiology tape can benefit a wide variety of musculoskeletal and sports injuries, plus inflammatory conditions.

 

It is almost identical to human skin in both thickness and elasticity, which allows kinesio tape to be worn without binding, constricting or restriction of your movement.

 

Kinesiology tape is used for treating athletic injuries and a variety of physical disorders. For the first decade after its introduction practitioners in Japan were the main users of the therapeutic kinesiology tape. By 1988 the tape had been adopted by Japanese Olympic and professional athletes before spreading across the world.

 

Many professional athletes use kinesiology taping improve their sporting performance, prevent injury and allow them to return to sport quicker.



Let’s take a look at the benefits of Kinesiology Taping:


Pain Relief via Structural Support for Weak or Injured Body Parts


Kinesiology tape is a flexible elastic tape that moves with your body. This provides supports to your body parts without the tape slipping.

 

By supporting your body part kinesiology tape is able to provide you with pain relief and muscular support to help control body parts affected by muscle inhibition.

 

Muscle Support


As previously mentioned, your muscle strength may be assisted by kinesiology tape via physical assistance and tactile feedback through the skin eg  proprioception boost. This phenomenon may assist both the able bodied athlete to enhance their performance and hypotonic eg children with low muscle tone.

 

Swelling Reduction


Kinesiology provides a passive lift to your skin via its elastic properties. This vacuum effect allows your lymphatic and venous drainage systems to drain and swollen or bruised tissue quicker than without the kinesiology tape.

 

It is also thought that this same principle can assist the removal of exercise byproducts like lactic acid that may contribute to post-exercise soreness eg delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).


Source

07
Aug 2015
Nice abs!

People work hard for perfect abs, but what you’ve been told about training your midsection may not necessarily be true – or even beneficial.


Don’t Believe These Flat Stomach Myths!

 

Myth 1: Spot-Reducing of Stomach Fat

 

One of the biggest and most popular stomach toning myth is the ability to target a certain area such as a belly with ab exercises to eliminate the fat from your midsection. You just can’t spot reduce where you would like. Of course this would be great if it was true but unfortunately there is more to it than that.

 

The main focus of developing abs and losing stomach fat is to reduce your overall bodyfat percentage. To accomplish this it is important to stick to a healthy diet plan that is filled with natural, unprocessed foods and focus doing both cardiovascular and weight training exercises. Doing this on a consistent basis will have your body fat levels dropping, muscles toning, and your belly looking tighter and flatter.

 

Myth 2: Only Exercise Will Get You Abs

 

Another popular myth to getting abs is that you can eat whatever you want as long as you workout. Of course working out helps you get leaner and burn fat but exercise alone will not cover up a poor diet.

 

It is crucial to stop eating high calorie, processed food, and start making changes to eating healthier. This healthy eating plan will spark the fat burning process and give you a solid foundation for your exercise program.

 

Myth 3: Daily Ab Training

 

For some reason people will treat the abdominal muscles differently than other muscles and want to train them on a daily basis. Training your abs on a daily basis is not only a myth but it can limit you from making progress and also increase your risk of getting injured.

 

Train your abs like any other group and work them a 2-3 times per week. This training method will help strengthen your core and will give your abs enough time to recover.

 

Myth 4: Exercise With High Reps Only

 

Another flat stomach myth is believing your core muscles will only respond to high repetition, no resistance exercses. True, there are some benefits to high repetition, no resistance exercises, but doing just this type of training will only get you so far and prevent you from getting optimal results.

 

If you want to get the most of your ab training then a combination of high reps with no resistance and low reps with resistance will get you the most out of your training. This type of combination will help strengthen and define the midsection.

 

Myth 5: Buying the Magic Product or Supplement

 

The last myth in the list is buying into the fact of getting six pack abs with a special product or supplement. Believing that a fat burning gel, ab belt, or any supplement is all that will be needed to melt away the fat without the discipline of proper nutrition is just a recipe for failure. The truth with these products is that very few will give you any type of results and aren’t worth the money invested.

 

So instead of chasing the magic product or gimmick, try going with what is proven to work and that is the discipline of proper nutrition and consistent exercise. Doing it the right way will keep the results lasting longer without hurting the wallet or the body.

 

 

 

Source

03
Aug 2015
Squatting hungry?

When utilized correctly, intermittent fasting has been shown to be an effective strategy for building muscle & burning fat at the gym.

 

It’s a debate that’s raged since the first weight was lifted: Is it better or worse to work out on an empty stomach? Wars have been waged and nations have fallen (okay, that’s a slight exaggeration) during the eternal battle of fed versus fasted exercise, but it’s time for this madness to end. We have the final answer.

 

It’s time to dismantle some old myths about eating and exercise.


Well, not the final answer. Different people work out best under different circumstances, and deciding whether someoneshould eat before training can be like telling them what time of day to work out or which diet they should follow—it largely depends on what works best for the individual. But it is time to dismantle some old myths.

 

Contrary to popular belief, research suggests that eating many small meals throughout the day won’t speed up the metabolism, skipping a meal won’t make you fat, and exercising on an empty stomach will not nullify a workout. In fact, skipping a meal or two, also known as “intermittent fasting” (IF), can be downright beneficial.

 

Optimizing Hormones (Fast)


If the fact that “Huge Jacked-man” practiced intermittent fasting to gain muscle for his latest Wolverine movie isn’t convincing enough, consider this: An empty stomach triggers a cascade of hormonal changes throughout the body that are surprisingly conducive to both building muscle and burning fat.

 

An empty stomach triggers a cascade of hormonal changes throughout the body that are conducive to both building muscle and burning fat.


The fasted state produces two significant effects:

 

1. Improved insulin sensitivity. Put very simply, the body releases insulin (a hormone) when we eat to help us absorb the nutrients from our food. The hormone then takes the sugars out of our bloodstream and directs them to the liver, muscles, and fat cells to be used as energy later on. The trouble is that eating too much and too often can make us more resistant to insulin’s effects, and while poor insulin sensitivity ups the risk of heart disease and cancer, it also makes it harder to lose body fat . Eating less frequently (i.e. fasting more regularly) is one way to help remedy the issue, because it results in the body releasing insulin less often, so we become more sensitive to it—and that makes it easier to lose fat, improves blood flow to muscles, and even curbs the impact of an unhealthy diet .

 

2. The second reason a good old-fashioned fast can promote muscle gain and fat loss comes down to growth hormone (GH), a magical elixir of a hormone that helps the body make new muscle tissue, burn fat, and improve bone quality, physical function, and longevity . Along with regular weight training and proper sleep, fasting is one of the best ways to increase the body’s GH: One study showed that 24 hours without food increases the male body’s GH production by 2,000 freakin’percent, and 1,300 percent in women. The effect ends when the fast does, which is a compelling reason to fast regularly in order to keep muscle-friendly hormones at their highest levels.

 

We can’t speak of muscle-friendly hormones without bringing uptestosterone. Testosterone helps increase muscle mass and reduce body fat while also improving energy levels, boosting libido, and even combating depression and heart problems—in both men and women . Fasting alone may not have any effect on testosterone, but there is a surprisingly simple way to produce large amounts of both “T” and growth hormone at the same time, creating an optimal environment for building muscle and torching fat: Exercising while fasted .

 

The Fast Way to Improve Performance


Exercise, especially intense exercise that uses a lot of muscles (thinkcompound movements like deadlifts and squats) causes a big surge in testosterone—which is why it can make good sense to combine exercise and fasting . Many studies have found that training in a fasted state is a terrific way to build lean mass and boost insulin sensitivity, not just because of the nifty hormonal responses, but also because it makes the body absorb the post-workout meal more efficiently.

 

Many studies have found that training in a fasted state is a terrific way to build lean mass and boost insulin sensitivity.
In short, fasted training helps to ensure that carbs, protein, and fats go to the right places in the body and are stored only minimally as body fat . Exercising on an empty stomach has been shown to be especially great for fat loss, and it’s even been shown that people who train while fasted become progressively better at burning fat at higher levels of intensity (possibly because of an increase in fat-oxidizing enzymes) .

 

Not interested in training like a bodybuilder? There are also potential benefits for endurance athletes, since fasted workouts can improve muscle glycogen storage efficiency (say that three times fast!) . What that means, basically, is that running on empty can make the body better at using its energy stores. The occasional fasted training session can improve the quality of “fed” workouts (or races) later on. In a nutshell: When the body learns to exert itself without any food, it gets better at performing when it does have fuel in the tank. Some studies have also shown that fasted workouts can significantly improve endurance athletes’ VO2 Max, which measures a person’s capacity to take in and use oxygen during exercise and is a pretty decent way of measuring someone’s fitness.

 

When the body learns to exert itself without any food, it gets better at performing when it does have fuel in the tank.
Now, we would be remiss if we didn’t acknowledge that some studies have shown impaired performance as a result of fasted exercise. That said, many of these studies are of Ramadan fasts, which don’t allow the consumption of fluids (which is not advisable when engaging in athletic activities) . Still, the prevalence of people who do eat before exercise is pretty good evidence that exercising after eating can work. Heck, there are even studies showing that eating before exercise can lead to fewer calories consumed throughout the day . But that doesn’t discredit the evidence that fasted workouts, even if occasional, can reap a lot of benefits.

 

Click here to take action! Read this article in its entirety and learn how to put IF to practice for you at Greatist.com (Source)

03
Aug 2015

 

Flex those muscles!

Want to look even better in your sleeveless attire? Try this routine for more shapely & toned triceps and biceps! 

A major mistake many women make in the gym is lifting too light.

 

Understand:

 

Putting on muscle is a not an easy process and women do not produce nearly enough hormones, namely testosterone, to put on size so quickly. Besides, if your diet is on point then there is no need to worry about getting “too big”.

 

The arms, i.e. the biceps and triceps, are a relatively small muscle group. This means that you don’t really receive much of a metabolic benefit when training them (you do not burn many calories).

 

Also:

 

The biceps are worked when you train your back and the triceps are worked when you train your chest.

 

So you don’t have to spend too much time training your arms.

 

Given that your chest and back workouts are on point, you do not need to spend more than 45 minutes of isolation work on your arms per week to keep them looking great.

 

The Two Basic Movements: Curls and Extensions

 

Your biceps are worked with the flexion of your elbow and your triceps are worked with the extension of your elbow.

 

Most bicep and tricep exercises revolve around the curl and the extension. These movements work the muscles by contracting them through their natural range of motion.

 

There are many variations of curling and extension movements but the basic principles of the flexion and extension of the elbow remain the same.

 

Performing any type of exercise recruits muscle fibers. The heavier you go, the more muscle fibers you recruit. Putting your muscles through a challenging workout is what gets them to grow, i.e. add tone.

 

Too many women curl with dumbbells that are too light. If a workout is not challenging your muscles will not grow, i.e. you will not add tone.

 

The Workout


This workout is suitable for women who are just starting out or need a more effective way to target their arms. It was put together by fitness model Dayna Tappan. You may have to go through some trial and error in order to pick the weight that works for you. Keep track of your workouts, i.e. sets, reps, and weights, as to measure your progress overtime.

 

  • Alternate Incline Dumbbell Curls: 4 sets of 12 reps
  • Triceps Push Down – 4 sets of 12 reps
  • 21’s – 4 sets of 21
  • Push-Ups – 4 sets of 12 reps
  • Burnout Sets:
  • Barbell Curl – 100 reps
  • Cable Overhead Tricep Extension – 100 reps
  • Rest: 45 seconds – 1 minute in between sets

 

Click here for a complete breakdown of these exercises and their corresponding video tutorials at PrimeHealthSolutions.org! (Source)

30
Jul 2015
Bike pain free!

Regardless of whether you’re a racer, mountain biker, commuter, or pleasure rider – your knees are the work horses of the sport.  Use these tips to keep them healthy!

 

With the high cost of gas, concern for the environment and obesity at an all time high, bike riding has become the main form of transportation for many commuters. Not only can you cut down on pollution and spend less time sitting in traffic, but you can also help reach your daily fitness goals. However, riding a bicycle can take a toll on your knees, if not done properly. While in a gym working out, you are much more cautious of your form rather then when bicycling outdoors. This article will discuss the importance of your bike being set up appropriately, and will go through the steps of setting up your bike properly to avoid injuries to your knees.

 

Steps for Perfect Biking Position

 

How to make sure your seat is in the appropriate position:

 

  1. Adjust your seat so its level
  2. While on the bike, make pedals parallel to the ground
  3. Use a plumb bob device align knee with pedal shaft and align your knees at either the pedal shaft or just behind the pedal shaft.
  4. While in this position, your knee should make a 90 degree angle

 

Be sure to check both legs before checking the angles of your knee.

 

How to accurately measure the angle of your knee:

 

  1. Sit on your bike to find a comfortable position for your seat
  2. Spin the crank arm until either left or right crank arm is in down stroke with opposing crank aligned up with seat tube angle Take goniometer and place on the outside (lateral side) of knee
  3. Align on arm of the goniometer with the greater trochanter
  4. Align the other arm of goniometer aligned with your shin
  5. Measure the angle of the knee. The recommended knee angle is 25-35 degrees.

 

If the angle of your knee is lower or higher, raise the height of your seat until you have reached the recommended angles.

 

How to accurately measure the angle without a goniometer:

 

  1. Stand with proper posture.
  2. Have a friend measure the height from the bottom of your feet to your hip
  3. Using this measurement, multiply by 96, 98, or 100%. (This number varies by your pedaling mechanics.)
  4. Use these measurement and apply to the bike
  5. Measure the distance from top of bike to the pedal. Make sure that the crank is aligned with seat tube angle.

 

These measurements will allow you to be within the proper 25-35 degree knee angle for riding.

 

Trochanteric Height  X 98% = Proper Seat Height

 

The Importance of a Proper Seat Height

 

Common amongst many cyclist and tri-athletes is the problem of “overuse-also known as repetitive knee injuries.” Repetitive knee injuries are associated with an improper seat high caused by an improper fitting bike. The best method in find your proper bike fit and avoid overuse injuries is having a knee angle of 25 to 35 degree. The average cyclist produces pedal strokes of 90 revolutions per minute. So if were to be cycling for 40 minutes, you would accumulate 360 pedal strokes over the duration of your ride. In theory, 360 pedal strokes is similar motion to completing 360 squats. When performed incorrectly, the repetitive motion of pedal strokes will lead to overuse and repetitive knee injuries.

 

Cycling with a seat height that is too low you can leave to anterior (front) pain in the knee. A bike seat that is too low will leave to muscle imbalance and injuries to the patella femoral ligaments.

 

Likewise, having a bike seat that is too high can lead to injuries to the posterior (behind) knee. Excessive extension of the knee will lead to posterior cruciate ligament or a hamstring tendon strain.

Source