Posts Categorized: Personal Training

30
March 2015
Come on Rock! When putting together your workout routine, the first major component you need to figure out is your exercise frequency. As in, how often and how many times should you workout per week? Now, I’ll admit… that’s a pretty broad question. After all, terms like “exercise frequency” and “workout frequency” can have a ton of different meanings. But for us though, here’s the 3 specific exercise frequencies that we need to care about most:
  • Overall Exercise Frequency: How often and how many times will we do any form of exercise (weight training, cardio, etc.) per week?
  • Weight Training Frequency: How often and how many times will we weight train per week?
  • Muscle Group/Body Part Frequency: How often and how many times will we train each muscle group or body part per week?
The main exercise frequency missing from that list is cardio frequency, but seeing as this is a guide to putting together the best weight training workout routine possible, cardio is a topic we’ll get to in depth at some other time (don’t worry, a cardio-specific guide is already on my to-do list). For now, let’s focus on those 3 extremely important frequencies.

Overall Exercise Frequency

So, the first thing we need to decide on is how many times we will workout per week total. This would include weight training workouts, cardio workouts, whatever. It’s our overall exercise frequency. Now, this is the one that can vary the most because it depends on many factors specific to you and your goal (example: a fat person with the primary goal of losing fat may have 4 cardio workouts per week, while a skinny person with the primary goal of building muscle may do no cardio whatsoever). Because of this, it’s impossible to say exactly how often/how many times everyone should be working out per week total. However, there is 1 general rule I can pretty much definitively set in terms of everyone’s overall exercise frequency. And that rule is: take at least 1 full day off per week from all forms of exercise. That means, AT THE VERY MOST, you should be exercising 6 times per week total (and again, this includes weight training, cardio, and any other form of exercise). I’m setting this rule because I am pretty confident that there is no one reading this that needs to be or would benefit from working out 7 days a week. In fact, I’d say that there are many people reading this who should set their maximum total exercise frequency at between 3-5 times per week depending on their goal. Why? Because it’s not only NOT necessary for reaching your goal… it’s almost always counterproductive.

Weight Training Frequency

While too many individual factors come into play for me to get super specific about overall exercise frequency, weight training frequency is the opposite. I can get pretty damn specific here. If it isn’t obvious enough, weight training frequency in this case will refer to how often and how many times we weight train per week. My recommendation is: the majority of the population should weight train 3-4 times per week, and never more than 2 consecutive days in a row. Some people can get away with 5 (although few truly need it), and some people can get by with 2. However, for most of the people, most of the time, you’ll get your best results with either 3 or 4 total weight training workouts per week. This is based on the fact that the majority of the most highly proven and intelligently designed workout programs in existence are all built around doing 3 or 4 weight training workouts per week. The same goes for having no more than 2 weight training workouts on back-to-back days. These recommendations appear to create the sweet spot in terms of allowing for optimal recovery, and when recovery is at its best, your results will be at their best too.

Muscle Group/Body Part Frequency

And last but definitely not least, we have muscle group/body part frequency. Out of all the different exercise frequencies, how often and how many times you should train each muscle group or body part per week is by FAR the most discussed, argued, thought about, screwed up, and potentially confusing one of them all. That’s why I think the best way to fully explain it all is by taking a look at the pros and cons of each of the 3 most common muscle group/body part frequencies. Those 3 frequencies are:
  1. Training each muscle group/body part once per week.
  2. Training each muscle group/body part twice per week.
  3. Training each muscle group/body part three times per week.
Source

16
March 2015
Train to Failure? “Training to failure” is a strength-and-conditioning approach that involves performing a movement or set of movements until you simply can’t do any more. When implemented correctly, this can be a useful tool for building strength and power, as well as burning fat. But because training to failure requires pushing your body to the limit, there are some potential downsides. So it’s important to know what you are getting into. According to Meredith Butulis, DPT, MSPT, Life Time Academy instructor and fitness competitor, training to failure can take different forms. One option is to select a weight that you know you can lift only, say, 10 times (but no more) with proper form. You would perform that final lift safely (but with difficulty) and then stop, knowing that on the 11th rep your form would fall apart. Another method involves intentionally selecting a weight that you can lift only eight or nine times before your form deteriorates — but still performing that 10th rep with improper form. The first option pushes the body up to failure while the second pushes past the point of failure. (This can be done with any number of reps, not just 10.) Training to failure isn’t relegated to the weight room. Butulis names high-intensity interval training (HIIT), CrossFit, Insanity, and Tabata as mainstream forms of training that encourage people to work to failure. Training to failure when doing resistance training has been shown to improve strength and power, Butulis says, and during high-intensity workouts, has been found to burn more calories in a shorter amount of time and contribute to improved cardiovascular and muscular endurance. Yet, this training methodology isn’t a foolproof way to make gains. “There are risks — chief among them  is overtraining,” says Butulis. Symptoms of overtraining include a decrease in athletic performance, prolonged recovery times, general fatigue and irritability, persistent muscle soreness, elevated heart rate, increased risk of infection, insomnia, appetite changes, and overuse injuries. (See “Overtraining: Myths, Facts and Fantasies” to learn more.) Butulis says the key to training to failure is to do it responsibly — by giving your body time to recover within a workout and between workouts. Here’s what she doesn’t like to see: “People engaging in high-intensity, high-volume forms of training where they work both their cardiovascular and muscular systems to the point that they can barely walk or function after the workout. For several days, they feel fatigued and have muscle soreness, yet they continue to push through this sensation with another similar workout.” When performing resistance training to failure, follow a program that uses a progression of reps, sets, and weight with sufficient recovery time between sets. Aim to perform your last rep with good form to avoid injury. In the case of HIIT, Butulis recommends limiting high-intensity sessions to three times per week. Source

14
March 2015

Protein much?

Protein powder is definitely a huge part of the health and fitness supplement world, and they’ve long been reported to help build muscle and to help lose weight. Sure, they may work, but the question is do you really need a powdered supplement to make the changes you want to see in your body?

How Much Protein do You Really Need? Protein is what helps build your muscle, and a powdered supplement used to enhance this effect. The thing is, unless you’re a strict vegan or follow a not-so-balanced vegetarian diet, you’re probably already getting enough protein in your diet from food- based sources. Your food based protein sources that are already helping build your muscle include meats like chicken, turkey, lean red meats, and fish. Eggs are another excellent source of the protein your body needs to build muscle. It can also be found in abundance in Greek yogurt, almonds, tofu, tempeh, and beans. How Much Protein is Needed to Build Muscle? What about if you’re trying to build muscle? The average Joe who sits around and really isn’t concerned about building muscle typically needs around .40 grams of protein per pound of body weight. On the other hand, when this average Joe decides they want to start working out build muscle, they’ll need to up their intake to .50 to .70 grams per pound of body weight. Those that are really doing strenuous strength training, it is recommended to get .70 or .80 grams, but nothing more. The whole idea of 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight is just that, an idea. This idea is the one that has gotten in the minds of so many who think they must pack on extra protein to build the muscles they desire. While more protein is needed yes, too much protein is absolutely not necessary at all. Some of the most elite athletes may go up to a gram of protein per pound a day, but this is way too much protein for the average person who is trying to build muscle. Stick to a little under a gram per pound of your body weight, and you’ll get plenty of the protein you need to build the muscles you desire. 3 Things You Should Know About Protein 1. Your Body Can Absorb Up to 100 Grams of Protein in a Sitting While there are obviously going to be certain situations where this won’t be the case, most people can absorb 100 grams of protein in a single sitting. While this is possible, it means eating a lot of food. 2. Different Proteins Digest at Different Speeds Different proteins are metabolized at different speeds in the body. To build muscle and stay lean, you’ll want to eat a quick digesting protein for your post workout meal and eat a slow digesting protein before going to bed. Protein from beef and whey digests quicker, while protein from eggs digests slower in the body. 3. You’re Not Always Going to Get the Protein You Need While it’s likely you’re going to get all the protein you need to build the muscles you desire, there are going to be days where you don’t. Some mornings just call for a bowl of fruit rather than a plate of eggs, and there will be times that you aren’t getting all the protein it takes to shape lean muscle. The “Need” for Protein Powder? There is one thing that should be set straight. You do not need protein powder to build muscle. That being said, there are times that it just might come in handy as a supplement. Those days when lean proteins like chicken and fish seem too much to handle, a protein powder can be just what you need to get the protein you need to build those muscles. If you think that adding a protein powder supplement would be right for your diet while you build the muscle you want, be sure to keep the following things in mind when looking for the perfect protein powder for your individual needs. 3 Ways to Choose the Right Protein Powder for You 1. Find One Low in Fat All protein powders are not created equal. You want to look for a powder that is low in fat but high in protein. Extra fat in your protein powder can mean extra fat on you, something that is absolutely unnecessary and completely avoidable. Look at your labels and make sure you’re not getting an overload of fat intake along with the extra protein. Think 1-5 grams of fat per serving, not 5-15 grams. 2. Buy Powders Made with Natural Ingredients Natural is always better, but unfortunately there are many protein powders that are made with a host of artificial ingredients. Avoid these protein powders just as you would any food that is artificially processed. Stick with the rule of no more than ten ingredients and you’ll be safe. Also be sure to avoid any protein powders with ingredients you can’t pronounce. If you don’t even know what they are, chances are they don’t belong in your body. 3. Use Only What You Need Sometimes people have a tendency to go overboard with protein powder supplements. They kind of come with this healthy illusion, and we tend to think the more of something healthy, the better. While in some cases this may be true (eat as many blueberries as you like) it’s not so much the case with protein powders. Find the one that fits your needs and use only what you need. If one serving is giving you what you need, then don’t use it three times a day. Use it in place of your regular protein intake when you feel you’re not going to get what you need from food alone. Be smart with your supplements and they’ll benefit you exactly the way they’re designed to. What are the Best Protein Powders? If you’re going to choose to use a protein powder, it’s best to know what you’re getting into when you go to buy one. Some of the most common protein powders include: Whey Whey protein is derived from dairy and is one of the most popular forms of protein powder available. It’s been shown to repair muscles post strength building session as well as increase muscle strength and size if it is consumed within two hours of your workout. Casein This is another protein derived from dairy, specifically cow’s milk. While it doesn’t make a suitable choice for vegans and some vegetarians, casein is comparable to whey protein. It is however, much slower to digest and is optimal to take before bed. Pea Peas are very high in protein content and there are a number of pea protein powders that can be found in various health food stores across the country. While it delivers less of a protein punch than some of the other powders, it is super suitable to those that are lactose intolerant or follow a strict vegan diet. It is also 100 percent gluten-free, something that is welcome to those with sensitivity to gluten. Soy Soy is a complete protein that is extremely popular amongst many vegetarians. While some soy is beneficial to a certain extent, there are many who overdo it on the whole soy intake factor. Too much soy can disrupt hormone balances and can severely affect estrogen levels in the body. It is recommended not as something that is used all the time, but the occasional soy protein powder shake is a good option when you need a little protein boost. Just be sure to get your protein powder from organic sources as it is one of the most genetically modified foods in the system. Hemp Hemp protein is derived from cannabis, but the amount of THC it contains is not enough to give you the psychoactive effects found in marijuana. Hemp actually has more to add than just protein and is considered an antioxidant that contains many essential vitamins and nutrients your body needs. The Bottom Line So, while you definitely don’t need a protein powder to build muscle, it won’t hurt if it is used in the right way. You can build all the muscle you want with proteins found from food based sources, but if you’re not getting all you need all the time, adding a protein powder can help. While good nutrition and food based proteins are the best option, they’re not always going to be the easiest option. Opt for a protein power in times like these and you’ll be good to go at building that muscle in the healthiest possible way. Source

13
March 2015
ACL Injuries Common Among Girls Knee problems? Let FIX Body Group help you get back to 100%. Schedule an appointment today! Everyone has heard about the horror of a torn ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). They put you out of the game for months, they’re painful, and they necessitate surgery. According to theDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco, there are over 200,000 ACL injuries each year, with women most at risk. Now, experts with the American Academy of Pediatrics are urging doctors and other health-focused authorities to train young athletes how to reduce these risks. The report, published in the journal Pediatrics, notes that ACL injuries have increased in athletes over 18 years old during the past 20 years, as more children are becoming active, especially girls. It urges doctors and school officials (physical education teachers and coaches) to engage in neuromuscular training with young athletes, which focuses on the proper way to bend, jump, land, and pivot on the knee. Practicing this could reduce the risk of an injury by as much as 63 percent, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found last month. Most people injure their ACLs — the ligament within the knee joint that helps with forward and backward motion — when they force the knee in a direction that it shouldn’t move in. These motions can include changing direction rapidly, stopping suddenly, landing from a jump in the wrong way, and less often, from direct contact to the knee, according to theAAOS. It’s especially important to protect the knee from these injuries because athletes who’ve already injured an ACL are at a six times greater risk of injuring it, or the one on the opposite knee, within two years of the first injury — not to mention the added risk of osteoarthritis in the knee later on. The report’s authors were most adamant about young girls undergoing the training. Studies have shown that women are two to 10 times more likely to sustain an ACL injury than men. In part, this risk comes from an increasing amount of girls who are picking up sports, such as soccer, lacrosse, basketball, and gymnastics. However, the unique shape of a woman’s body could add to this risk, as some tend to have knees that angle inward — known as knee valgus. Landing from a jump in the wrong position could force the knee further inward, injuring it. This, combined with the tendency for girls to land from a jump with their bodies tilted sideways, or on only one foot, could put more pressure on the knee, causing a worse injury, the AAOS said. To avoid this problem, young female athletes should engage in exercises to strengthen the legs and improve stability, while also learning about the proper, safe ways to move. Such exercises include jumping and balance exercises (on a balance board). In as little as six weeks, one can start to see results, according to the AAOS. Source

02
March 2015
Because of the way “meatheads” and “gym bros” are portrayed in popular culture, weight lifting and even gym culture in general seems pretty intimidating, especially to newcomers who are unfamiliar with the environment. Yes, the gym, and especially the weight section, can be an intimidating place, but the benefits that you can gain from strength training by way of lifting weights, are way too incredible to pass up just because you’re worried about what a group of “muscle-y” gym members might think. Improve your life by lifting weights!In fact, if you pay a visit to the weight section of your gym you’ll most likely find yourself among a diverse group of members. Yes, there will be some “bulky” guys lifting heavy weights, but you’ll probably also encounter other men and women of all different shapes, sizes, and abilities. And if you join them by deciding to begin a regular weight lifting program, you’ll begin to reap countless health benefits such as reduced body fat, a decreased risk for heart disease, and decreased blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Plus, what many people don’t realize about lifting weights is that in addition to the physical benefits you’ll gain, it has the ability to expand your life in so many other ways. Here are just a few of the ways you might see your life improve when you start lifting weights. 1.  Lifting weights can improve your focus “In today’s world we’re bombarded by social media, workloads, and a constant to do list,” says personal trainer, health coach, and nutrition expert Susannah VanWinkle. “In the gym, you learn to leave it all behind and have one singular goal — progress.” 2.  Lifting weights can improve your body image Ragen Chastain, a plus-size fitness professional, dance champion, marathoner, and Ironman triathlete in-training says that lifting weights can help shift the focus of your body image from size to ability. In other words, instead of focusing on your weight or the size of your waist, you’ll begin to better appreciate your body for its strength and what it can do. “This can be especially true for plus-sized people, myself included, who were warned against lifting weights because of the fear that it would ‘bulk us up’,” she said. “In truth, when we focus on actual fitness instead of body size, more muscle can mean more ease in moving our bodies, and better relationships with our bodies and with exercise.” 3. Lifting weights can improve athletic performance “Lifting weights can improve performance for someone who has hit a plateau in their chosen discipline,” says Chastain. “Whether they are a runner, cyclist, volleyball player, or wrestler—there are so many different techniques in weight lifting, it’s not just about building strength. Programs can be built to help with a number of goals whether it’s strength, balance, speed, mobility, or something else.” 4. Lifting weights can improve your confidence. “There’s something about strength training that makes you feel, well… Strong,” says Laura Williams, founder of Girls Gone Sporty and an ACSM-HFS certified fitness professional. “And that feeling of inner strength — that your muscles are growing, you’re developing definition, and you’re boosting your metabolism — all of those work together as a powerful confidence-booster.” 5. Lifting weights can improve your bone strength. “Strength training isn’t just good for the muscles,” Williams added. “It’s good for the bones. Weight bearing exercise, particularly closed-circuit exercises like squats, lunges, and pushups, place stress on the bones in a way that stimulates osteoblast activity and bone growth.” Source

01
March 2015
The San Diego Half Marathon is a week away, and if all the hype has you thinking about giving it a go next year – FIX Body Group can be with you every step of the way! [hr toptext=”” size=”” custom_size=”5″ hide_mobile_hr=”true”] Train hard! Original article by Lindsay Benoit. Training for my first half marathon has been exciting and challenging. Because I hadn’t run much more than four miles leading up to my training, adding miles also starting taking a toll on my body. Muscles began hurting that never did before. With preexisting lower back issues, I knew that I needed to be careful when embarking on the runDisney Wine & Dine Half Marathon I will be running this November. I turned to one of my favorite trainers, Rebecca Heiberg, a New York-based personal trainer and athlete who has worked prepared clients for races. Her goal is to help me get strong before issues begin flaring up and providing a workout program to keep me safe and get ready to run that 13.1 miles in Disney! Pre-Run Warm-Ups are Essential: “When your body is going to be in motion then you need to warm it up in motion — your muscles need to be prepared for what you are about to do,” says Heiberg. “Your stretching routine should consist of “dynamic” stretches which are stretches performed on the move that mimic movement patterns similar to the sport or activity you are about to engage in.” The top five include:
    1. Walking Knee Tugs: Bring one knee up to your chest as high as it can go then with both hands, pull your knee into your chest. Alternate legs while slowly walking forward.
    2. Frankenstein Walks: Step forward and kick one leg up to waist height or as far as you can. Be sure to keep your hips level and have no bend in the knee. Repeat this as you walk forward. Be sure to stand up tall to maintain a neutral spine and only raise the leg as much as you can without hunching over and rounding your back. Do 15-20 reps on each side.
    3. Lateral Band Walks: Put a latex band (they vary with resistances) around both ankles. Start with the your feet hip-width distance apart and maintain tension on the band at all times. Keep knees slightly bent, chest up and hips back. Step out to the side with your heel slightly leading the way. Bring the other leg back to the start position. Repeat 8-10 reps on each side. If your tushy is burning then you are doing it right!
    4. Kick Butt Walking Lunges: Step one foot forward into a lunge. Bend the knee until the thigh is parallel to the floor and the knee is in line with the ankle. Push back upward and lift the back leg off the floor and drive your heel into your butt. Take that foot and step into a lunge to continue on to the opposite side. Do 10-15 reps on each side.
    5. High Heel Walks: Take small steps forward on your tippy toes as if you were wearing a pair of high heels. Continue to walk like this until you have taken 15-20 steps on each leg. (That’s right boys, feel our pain!)
Don’t Forget that Post-Run Cool Down: “Static stretching, which is done while the body is at rest and the lengthened muscle is held for at least 30 seconds, is the key to help those muscles recover,” adds Heiberg. Remember, never stretch an injury and be sure to hold for at least 30 seconds but no longer than two minutes. Don’t forget to breathe during these stretches! Rebecca’s five post-run stretches include:
    1. Standing Calf Stretch: Calves can be stretched in a number of different ways but I find this one to be easy and very efficient. Place the foot on a small step. Let the heel fall towards the floor. Keeping your back flat, lean forward over the front leg for a deeper stretch. Remember to hold for at least 30 seconds and repeat up to three times per leg.
    2. Single Leg Hami Stretch: Lay face up on the floor. Lift one leg without bending the knee. Keep the foot of the elevated leg relaxed and keep the toes of the leg on the floor pointing up to the sky. Grab behind the quad of the elevated leg with both hands and pull the leg gently towards your head. Hold here for 30 seconds. Repeat three times on each side.
    3. Standing Quad Stretch: Standing up with feet shoulder width apart, lift the right foot up toward your right glute. Pull your foot gently toward the glute with the right hand. For a deeper stretch, push the foot into the hand. This will activate the quad and give a deeper more intense stretch. Feel free to use a wall or a stationary object to hold on to for balance. Hold for 30 secs and repeat three times on each leg.
    4. Thread the Needle: This one is my favorites. It really targets the glutes and loosens them up after a long run. Lay down on your back. Place your right ankle directly above your left knee. Your right knee is now bent and forms a space between your legs. Place your right hand through the hole and your left hand to the outside of the left leg. Now, grabbing behind the left leg with both hands, pull the left leg off the floor and toward your chest. Hold 30 seconds to one minute. Repeat 2-3 times per leg.
    5. Butterfly Stretch: Sit on the floor and place the bottom of your feet together. Sit up nice and tall. Grab your ankles and press your elbows on the inside of your thighs. Push the knees down with the elbows and lean forward maintaining a flat back. Be sure not to bounce but apply steady pressure. Hold 30 seconds to two minutes. Repeat 2-3 times.
Pay Attention To Your Legs: You will be logging a lot of miles when training and common issues are in your calf muscles and shins. I personally have issues with both. Try Rebecca’s moves to work on these areas: Strengthening Your Calf Muscles: The calf muscle is made up of two different muscles — gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. There are two different types of exercises that will target each muscle. The standing calf raise will target the soleus muscle and the seated calf raise which will target both the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Perform both exercises to properly strengthen the calf.
  • Standing Calf Raises: Find a stair and place both feet approximately hip width distance apart. An easy way to check your form is to make sure that your knees and hips are stacked over your ankles. Bring your toes to the edge of the stair and let the heels come off and lower to the floor. Press down in to the balls of your feet and raise your body up towards the sky. Lower back to the start position and repeat 15-20 reps, 2-3 times. A progression to this exercise is a single leg calf raise. Follow the same rules above but use only one leg at a time. Do not overdue it. Listen to your body and choose the number of reps accordingly. Feel free to add weight for an additional progression.
  • Seated Calf Raises: Find a chair and have a seat. (or use a machine at the gym) Place both feet on the ground with your knees stacked above your ankles to ensure proper alignment. Sit up nice and tall and engage your core. Raise your heels off the floor coming on to the balls of your feet and return back to the floor. To make it more intense you can add additional weight on top of your thighs. Repeat 15-20 reps, 2-3 times.
Shin Splints: “If you are experiencing shin splints, ice and rest are best,” says Heiberg. “Training through the pain is not a smart idea and can lead to further and more severe injuries.” To keep those shins strong, try the below to help strengthen:
    • Toe Crunches: Sit in a chair with feet on the floor. Use a dishtowel or any cloth and place on the ground in front of foot. Keep your heel on the ground and use your toes to grab the towel and pull in toward the foot. Flex the toes point the toes over and over until the towel begins to move and scrunch up toward the foot.
    • Flex and Extend With Resistance: Sit down on the floor with legs extended in front of your body. Place a towel or resistance band around the bottom of one foot and pull lightly toward your body. Now point your toe away from the resistance. Repeat 15-20 reps, 1-2 times on each leg.
    • Foot Pull-Ups: Usually there is a few inches of open space at the bottom of a couch. You’ll need a space just like this for this exercise. While standing, take one foot and place just your toes underneath the couch. Pull your toes up toward the sky (flexing the foot) and hold for two seconds before releasing back to the start position. Do 10 reps, 2-3 times on each leg.
Happy and safe training! Source

05
February 2015
With summer right around the corner, our thoughts start turning to shorts, tank tops, sun dresses and bathing suits!  This is often enough to get someone to step back into the gym – but, how many times have you set new fitness goals for yourself only to lose interest in a couple of weeks?  We all need a little help sometimes, and not just the average gym goer.  It is for this reason that even as a trainer myself, I still capitalize on the tremendous benefits of working with a personal trainer.  Personal trainers are not just for stars and athletes.  Every single person can benefit from working with a trainer.  Personal training is truly an investment in one’s own health and well-being. Let’s take a look at the reasons why all people, including myself, achieve more working with a personal trainer. Personal Trainer1. ACCOUNTABILITY & MOTIVATION Trainers are experts at holding you accountable. You have a set, paid appointment. Your trainer will be there waiting for you with a smile on his/her face each and every time you show up. They help you to not only develop your own personalized goals but to also develop a realistic and achievable plan to attain these goals. Trainers have the ability to believe in you even when you are feeling at your lowest and don’t believe in yourself. “CAN’T” is not in a trainer’s vocabulary. 2. DEVELOP A ROUTINE Sure, it’s easy to get to the gym and hop on the elliptical, but then what? Trainers are educated on the most effective ways to help you get to your fitness goals. They will work with you to develop a routine that makes since and is realistic for you. If you haven’t worked out in months and are just returning to the gym, a trainer will not expect you to begin a fitness regimen consisting of 60 minute routines 5 days a week. A trainer will help you to figure out what makes since in your life that will maximize your time in the gym but not overwhelm you. They will work with you to develop an exercise routine that takes you on the path to achieving your personal goals. All along the way holding you accountable and providing motivation! 3. FRESH NEW PERSPECTIVES & IDEAS ON HEALTH, NUTRITION, AND FITNESS There is an overwhelming amount of fitness, nutrition, and health information available. It is impossible for the average person to have time to sift through this information for what is most valid, accurate and up to date. It is the job of the trainer to stay on top of health trends and continue their education in order to provide you with the safest and most accurate information in the industry. Is that new fad diet really effective? Will I really get a bikini body by doing that popular workout? Is it true what I read in this fitness magazine? These are just some of the questions trainers deal with on a daily basis. Trainers are able to use their education, knowledge and experience to provide you with tips and tricks to help you develop a healthier lifestyle. We are constantly sharing recipes and ways to contend with obstacles in your nutrition such as “candy in the office”, or how to manage menu’s when dining out with friends. Often trainers are the first to say, “Hey, you’ve been complaining about this for a little bit. Maybe you should go see a doctor, massage therapist, nutritionist, etc.” We see you on a regular basis and are able to recognize if something is different or just not right and are happy to point it out and refer you to the appropriate expert. We care about your health and well-being! And we will hold you accountable to taking care of yourself nutritionally, physically, and with your overall health! 4. SOLID, CONSISTENT, NON-JUDGMENTAL SUPPORT Not everyone has your best interest in mind. Your trainer, though, only cares about you and your success. Your trainer will be there. Each hour you spend with your trainer is an hour to focus on you and only you! They will provide consistent feedback to help you better yourself and achieve your goals. Most importantly, the trainer is able to do this without making you feel inadequate or judged. We have all gone into the gym and worried about what we look like doing an exercise or compared ourselves to someone else. Trainers don’t judge or derogate. They help you to see all of your successes, big and small, even when you can’t see them yourself. Through this support, trainers will hold you accountable and motivate you, despite your feelings about yourself! 5. PROPER TECHNIQUE & FORM Watching all the you tube videos in the world and reading all the fitness magazines, does not substitute having a person by your side providing you immediate feedback on form and technique. It is very easy to hurt yourself in the gym. Trainers pay attention, cue both your mind and your body and help you achieve your goals more quickly by making sure you are doing each exercise correctly. They can help you develop better running form, improve your posture, and increase your strength by teaching you to recruit the proper muscles and making a mind body connection. With each exercise trainers will hold you accountable to proper form and technique preventing injury! 6. INJURY PREVENTION and/or INJURY REHAB Often people shy away from equipment in the gym because they are afraid of hurting themselves. Likewise, one may stop attending the gym due to an injury. Trainers will teach you how to use equipment properly so that you do not injure yourself. Trainers will also work with you to prevent injuries in everyday life by helping you increase your balance, flexibility, and core strength. They are able to focus on specific exercises that will benefit you based on your activities of daily living. And in the chance that you have suffered an injury, trainers are able to work with you to safely exercise, keep your range of motion, and get your strength back. Just recently, I broke my leg. My trainer did not let me stop working out. After communicating with my physical therapist, we were able to develop a plan for me to keep up my upper body strength and begin rehab on my leg. A personal trainer will not let you use an injury as an excuse to not workout!! 7. SPORTS SPECIFIC TRAINING Are you an athlete? Even a recreational athlete can get better at their sport. Trainers have studied body patterns and movements. They know the best exercises to help you develop strength, endurance, speed, and agility for your sport. A trainer will know if you have been keeping up your routine through your performance and will hold you accountable to the sports specific exercises in your program! 8. MAXIMIZE WORKOUT/MINIMIZE TIME You will burn more calories in less time when working with a trainer. A trainer develops a program that is efficient and allows you to get the most in, in the shortest amount of time. Time does not need to be lost at the gym. If you are finding it hard to find time to workout, not only will a trainer help you to get the most out of your work out, but they will teach you how you can do that on your own. Each week trainers will follow up to see if you achieved our workout goals for the week, holding you accountable to exercise on your own time and make tweaks to the program to help you be successful! 9. PERSONALIZED PROGRAM Personal training is just that, PERSONAL! A trainer will develop a program that is specific to you and your goals. If you have an injury, if you want to climb a mountain, if you want lose weight to become pregnant, have lower back pain… The program will be specific to you and only you! A program your trainer takes the time to develop and teach to you. You know they are going to hold you accountable to achieving the goals of that program! 10. RELATIONSHIP BUILDING Some of my favorite time during the week is with my clients. You develop a relationship with your trainer like no other. Your relationship is very personal. There are not very many people whom you share your goals so specifically, who in turn will work so diligently to help you achieve them. Often that hour (or two, or three) a week you spend with your trainer, is the only time in your week that is truly devoted to you, your goals, and your successes. I have had sessions in which my client is angry and just wants to workout. There is no talking for the hour. I have had sessions with clients who have recently lost a loved one and their hour with me is their time to escape. I also have sessions with clients where they are so excited to share with me their personal successes and how what we are doing in training is translating into their life outside the gym. Often times intimate details of life are shared in sessions and I am so grateful that people trust me enough to allow me these details. It is these personal relationships and the intimate knowledge of who you are that helps the trainer work specifically with you and to hold you accountable to your goals! Although this post is titled 10 Benefits of Personal Training I thought it was important to emphasize the eleventh. The one that is reoccurring through each bullet point. The benefit that above all is most important. 11. RESULTS Working with a trainer will allow you to achieve the results that you cannot achieve on your own. Each person’s goals are extremely personal. Whether it be weight loss, injury rehab, or companionship. A trainer is going to develop goals that will lead you down a path to success. As a trainer, I work diligently with each of my clients to help them recognize their results, tangible and intangible, as well as results they never anticipated having. It is these results that not only hold you accountable to me, but they hold me, your trainer, accountable to you!   Source

01
October 2013
shin splints
A recent review on research of shin splints (or medial tibial stress syndrome) in the journal Sports Medicine has given many athletes suffering from the condition little hope. Dutch researchers concluded that, “no intervention has been proven to be effective for medial tibial stress syndrome.” In the study, groups of people received various common treatments for the injury in contrast with those who did not. Examples of the treatments used were leg braces, ice massage, ultrasound, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, and iontophoresis. The study concluded by recommending short periods of rest from weight bearing activity to allow the bone to heal. This is standard advice in the medical community, and the treatments studied in the article are also typical, if conservative methods for sports medicine practitioners. The problem with approaching this sort of injury with conservative, standard treatments and rest, is that it fails to decipher how the injury occurred, and if it will return once the activity is resumed. Most injuries don’t just come about in one location independent of everything else going on in the body. An injury like shin splints is the final product, which is the painful conclusion, but usually a progressive buildup of other developments in the body lead to it. This project also neglected to study whether other treatments such as A.R.T., Myofascial release techniques, massage, and changing of running mechanics, and corrective exercise would help heal the injury quicker. In my experience, this sort of injury when treated holistically and by addressing biomechanics, can be resolved very quickly. Weekly, we see runners in our clinic with shin splints that are resolved in a few treatments, and often can continue to train through the injury and treatment process. Here’s my standard approach to treating shin splints: 1. Look at the patient’s biomechanics: Often there is too much pronation, or external rotation of the legs. At what angle does their lower leg contact the ground? Often it will be an angle greater than 90 degrees. Often there is glute weakness and some tightness in the anterior hip. 2. Corrective exercises and strength training for the weak muscles done daily at home. Stretching and foam rolling for the tibialis anterior and posterior, soleus, and peroneals and quadriceps. 3. Myofascial release and A.R.T. for the lower leg and quadriceps, TFL, and psoas. 4. Running on soft surfaces only, depending on severity and treatment frequency 5. Address shoe choices and recommend changes depending on the type of runner, mileage, training surface, and biomechanics 6. Ice cup massage for the shin, compression socks if travelling or sitting a lot.

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28
August 2013
The Fix team will be out in force at the Pacific Beach Movin’ Shoes store to provide injury screening and diagnostics this Saturday 8/31, from 9-11:30am. Our team of chiropractors, therapists, and trainers will analyze your imbalances and deficiencies and suggest action steps for improvement. Movin’ Shoes will also hold a labor day sale so if you need some shoes or would like to get recommendations for shoe choices make sure to come by also. Knowing your physical risks and limitations through our injury screen will be helpful when you go to purchase shoes. Thanks to Movin’ Shoes and we’ll see you all out there! Check out facebook here to get more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/430896390356516/438268076286014/?notif_t=plan_mall_activity

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