Monthly Archives: August 2015

07
August 2015
Tape it up!

One of our specialties at FIX Body Group, many athletes are reliant on this practice for pain relief and muscular support.



Kinesiology tape is a thin, stretchy, elastic cotton strip with an acrylic adhesive. Therapeutic kinesiology tape can benefit a wide variety of musculoskeletal and sports injuries, plus inflammatory conditions.

 

It is almost identical to human skin in both thickness and elasticity, which allows kinesio tape to be worn without binding, constricting or restriction of your movement.

 

Kinesiology tape is used for treating athletic injuries and a variety of physical disorders. For the first decade after its introduction practitioners in Japan were the main users of the therapeutic kinesiology tape. By 1988 the tape had been adopted by Japanese Olympic and professional athletes before spreading across the world.

 

Many professional athletes use kinesiology taping improve their sporting performance, prevent injury and allow them to return to sport quicker.



Let’s take a look at the benefits of Kinesiology Taping:


Pain Relief via Structural Support for Weak or Injured Body Parts


Kinesiology tape is a flexible elastic tape that moves with your body. This provides supports to your body parts without the tape slipping.

 

By supporting your body part kinesiology tape is able to provide you with pain relief and muscular support to help control body parts affected by muscle inhibition.

 

Muscle Support


As previously mentioned, your muscle strength may be assisted by kinesiology tape via physical assistance and tactile feedback through the skin eg  proprioception boost. This phenomenon may assist both the able bodied athlete to enhance their performance and hypotonic eg children with low muscle tone.

 

Swelling Reduction


Kinesiology provides a passive lift to your skin via its elastic properties. This vacuum effect allows your lymphatic and venous drainage systems to drain and swollen or bruised tissue quicker than without the kinesiology tape.

 

It is also thought that this same principle can assist the removal of exercise byproducts like lactic acid that may contribute to post-exercise soreness eg delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).


Source

07
August 2015
Nice abs!

People work hard for perfect abs, but what you’ve been told about training your midsection may not necessarily be true – or even beneficial.


Don’t Believe These Flat Stomach Myths!

 

Myth 1: Spot-Reducing of Stomach Fat

 

One of the biggest and most popular stomach toning myth is the ability to target a certain area such as a belly with ab exercises to eliminate the fat from your midsection. You just can’t spot reduce where you would like. Of course this would be great if it was true but unfortunately there is more to it than that.

 

The main focus of developing abs and losing stomach fat is to reduce your overall bodyfat percentage. To accomplish this it is important to stick to a healthy diet plan that is filled with natural, unprocessed foods and focus doing both cardiovascular and weight training exercises. Doing this on a consistent basis will have your body fat levels dropping, muscles toning, and your belly looking tighter and flatter.

 

Myth 2: Only Exercise Will Get You Abs

 

Another popular myth to getting abs is that you can eat whatever you want as long as you workout. Of course working out helps you get leaner and burn fat but exercise alone will not cover up a poor diet.

 

It is crucial to stop eating high calorie, processed food, and start making changes to eating healthier. This healthy eating plan will spark the fat burning process and give you a solid foundation for your exercise program.

 

Myth 3: Daily Ab Training

 

For some reason people will treat the abdominal muscles differently than other muscles and want to train them on a daily basis. Training your abs on a daily basis is not only a myth but it can limit you from making progress and also increase your risk of getting injured.

 

Train your abs like any other group and work them a 2-3 times per week. This training method will help strengthen your core and will give your abs enough time to recover.

 

Myth 4: Exercise With High Reps Only

 

Another flat stomach myth is believing your core muscles will only respond to high repetition, no resistance exercses. True, there are some benefits to high repetition, no resistance exercises, but doing just this type of training will only get you so far and prevent you from getting optimal results.

 

If you want to get the most of your ab training then a combination of high reps with no resistance and low reps with resistance will get you the most out of your training. This type of combination will help strengthen and define the midsection.

 

Myth 5: Buying the Magic Product or Supplement

 

The last myth in the list is buying into the fact of getting six pack abs with a special product or supplement. Believing that a fat burning gel, ab belt, or any supplement is all that will be needed to melt away the fat without the discipline of proper nutrition is just a recipe for failure. The truth with these products is that very few will give you any type of results and aren’t worth the money invested.

 

So instead of chasing the magic product or gimmick, try going with what is proven to work and that is the discipline of proper nutrition and consistent exercise. Doing it the right way will keep the results lasting longer without hurting the wallet or the body.

 

 

 

Source

03
August 2015
Squatting hungry?

When utilized correctly, intermittent fasting has been shown to be an effective strategy for building muscle & burning fat at the gym.

 

It’s a debate that’s raged since the first weight was lifted: Is it better or worse to work out on an empty stomach? Wars have been waged and nations have fallen (okay, that’s a slight exaggeration) during the eternal battle of fed versus fasted exercise, but it’s time for this madness to end. We have the final answer.

 

It’s time to dismantle some old myths about eating and exercise.


Well, not the final answer. Different people work out best under different circumstances, and deciding whether someoneshould eat before training can be like telling them what time of day to work out or which diet they should follow—it largely depends on what works best for the individual. But it is time to dismantle some old myths.

 

Contrary to popular belief, research suggests that eating many small meals throughout the day won’t speed up the metabolism, skipping a meal won’t make you fat, and exercising on an empty stomach will not nullify a workout. In fact, skipping a meal or two, also known as “intermittent fasting” (IF), can be downright beneficial.

 

Optimizing Hormones (Fast)


If the fact that “Huge Jacked-man” practiced intermittent fasting to gain muscle for his latest Wolverine movie isn’t convincing enough, consider this: An empty stomach triggers a cascade of hormonal changes throughout the body that are surprisingly conducive to both building muscle and burning fat.

 

An empty stomach triggers a cascade of hormonal changes throughout the body that are conducive to both building muscle and burning fat.


The fasted state produces two significant effects:

 

1. Improved insulin sensitivity. Put very simply, the body releases insulin (a hormone) when we eat to help us absorb the nutrients from our food. The hormone then takes the sugars out of our bloodstream and directs them to the liver, muscles, and fat cells to be used as energy later on. The trouble is that eating too much and too often can make us more resistant to insulin’s effects, and while poor insulin sensitivity ups the risk of heart disease and cancer, it also makes it harder to lose body fat . Eating less frequently (i.e. fasting more regularly) is one way to help remedy the issue, because it results in the body releasing insulin less often, so we become more sensitive to it—and that makes it easier to lose fat, improves blood flow to muscles, and even curbs the impact of an unhealthy diet .

 

2. The second reason a good old-fashioned fast can promote muscle gain and fat loss comes down to growth hormone (GH), a magical elixir of a hormone that helps the body make new muscle tissue, burn fat, and improve bone quality, physical function, and longevity . Along with regular weight training and proper sleep, fasting is one of the best ways to increase the body’s GH: One study showed that 24 hours without food increases the male body’s GH production by 2,000 freakin’percent, and 1,300 percent in women. The effect ends when the fast does, which is a compelling reason to fast regularly in order to keep muscle-friendly hormones at their highest levels.

 

We can’t speak of muscle-friendly hormones without bringing uptestosterone. Testosterone helps increase muscle mass and reduce body fat while also improving energy levels, boosting libido, and even combating depression and heart problems—in both men and women . Fasting alone may not have any effect on testosterone, but there is a surprisingly simple way to produce large amounts of both “T” and growth hormone at the same time, creating an optimal environment for building muscle and torching fat: Exercising while fasted .

 

The Fast Way to Improve Performance


Exercise, especially intense exercise that uses a lot of muscles (thinkcompound movements like deadlifts and squats) causes a big surge in testosterone—which is why it can make good sense to combine exercise and fasting . Many studies have found that training in a fasted state is a terrific way to build lean mass and boost insulin sensitivity, not just because of the nifty hormonal responses, but also because it makes the body absorb the post-workout meal more efficiently.

 

Many studies have found that training in a fasted state is a terrific way to build lean mass and boost insulin sensitivity.
In short, fasted training helps to ensure that carbs, protein, and fats go to the right places in the body and are stored only minimally as body fat . Exercising on an empty stomach has been shown to be especially great for fat loss, and it’s even been shown that people who train while fasted become progressively better at burning fat at higher levels of intensity (possibly because of an increase in fat-oxidizing enzymes) .

 

Not interested in training like a bodybuilder? There are also potential benefits for endurance athletes, since fasted workouts can improve muscle glycogen storage efficiency (say that three times fast!) . What that means, basically, is that running on empty can make the body better at using its energy stores. The occasional fasted training session can improve the quality of “fed” workouts (or races) later on. In a nutshell: When the body learns to exert itself without any food, it gets better at performing when it does have fuel in the tank. Some studies have also shown that fasted workouts can significantly improve endurance athletes’ VO2 Max, which measures a person’s capacity to take in and use oxygen during exercise and is a pretty decent way of measuring someone’s fitness.

 

When the body learns to exert itself without any food, it gets better at performing when it does have fuel in the tank.
Now, we would be remiss if we didn’t acknowledge that some studies have shown impaired performance as a result of fasted exercise. That said, many of these studies are of Ramadan fasts, which don’t allow the consumption of fluids (which is not advisable when engaging in athletic activities) . Still, the prevalence of people who do eat before exercise is pretty good evidence that exercising after eating can work. Heck, there are even studies showing that eating before exercise can lead to fewer calories consumed throughout the day . But that doesn’t discredit the evidence that fasted workouts, even if occasional, can reap a lot of benefits.

 

Click here to take action! Read this article in its entirety and learn how to put IF to practice for you at Greatist.com (Source)

03
August 2015

 

Flex those muscles!

Want to look even better in your sleeveless attire? Try this routine for more shapely & toned triceps and biceps! 

A major mistake many women make in the gym is lifting too light.

 

Understand:

 

Putting on muscle is a not an easy process and women do not produce nearly enough hormones, namely testosterone, to put on size so quickly. Besides, if your diet is on point then there is no need to worry about getting “too big”.

 

The arms, i.e. the biceps and triceps, are a relatively small muscle group. This means that you don’t really receive much of a metabolic benefit when training them (you do not burn many calories).

 

Also:

 

The biceps are worked when you train your back and the triceps are worked when you train your chest.

 

So you don’t have to spend too much time training your arms.

 

Given that your chest and back workouts are on point, you do not need to spend more than 45 minutes of isolation work on your arms per week to keep them looking great.

 

The Two Basic Movements: Curls and Extensions

 

Your biceps are worked with the flexion of your elbow and your triceps are worked with the extension of your elbow.

 

Most bicep and tricep exercises revolve around the curl and the extension. These movements work the muscles by contracting them through their natural range of motion.

 

There are many variations of curling and extension movements but the basic principles of the flexion and extension of the elbow remain the same.

 

Performing any type of exercise recruits muscle fibers. The heavier you go, the more muscle fibers you recruit. Putting your muscles through a challenging workout is what gets them to grow, i.e. add tone.

 

Too many women curl with dumbbells that are too light. If a workout is not challenging your muscles will not grow, i.e. you will not add tone.

 

The Workout


This workout is suitable for women who are just starting out or need a more effective way to target their arms. It was put together by fitness model Dayna Tappan. You may have to go through some trial and error in order to pick the weight that works for you. Keep track of your workouts, i.e. sets, reps, and weights, as to measure your progress overtime.

 

  • Alternate Incline Dumbbell Curls: 4 sets of 12 reps
  • Triceps Push Down – 4 sets of 12 reps
  • 21’s – 4 sets of 21
  • Push-Ups – 4 sets of 12 reps
  • Burnout Sets:
  • Barbell Curl – 100 reps
  • Cable Overhead Tricep Extension – 100 reps
  • Rest: 45 seconds – 1 minute in between sets

 

Click here for a complete breakdown of these exercises and their corresponding video tutorials at PrimeHealthSolutions.org! (Source)